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Topic: The "role" of cations and crystallized water in a complex structure  (Read 3861 times)

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Savager

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In the complex ion K4[Ni(NCS)6].4H2O, the K+ ions are just there to neutralise the charge, as all solids complexes have to have an overall neutral charge and they attach to four of the NCS anions. Am I right?

But I don't understand what the actual role of the water molecules are. I know they're incorporated in the crystal structure, but where and why? Do they stabilise the structure?

Offline Mitch

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Re:The "role" of cations and crystallized water in a complex structure
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2005, 12:13:29 PM »
There just ligands. Look up ligand field theory in your textbook, your question is too broad.
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Offline AWK

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Re:The "role" of cations and crystallized water in a complex structure
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2005, 01:44:33 AM »
The detailed structure (X-ray structure of this compound is not known).
Nickel thiocyanate is anhydrous.
The first possibility (my guess) is a mixed salt hydrate: nickel thiocyanate.potassium thiocyanate.water. This is based on low stability constants for nickel thiocyanate complexes. Up to K3 are only listed.
The next possibility K4[Ni(SCN)6] hydrate or its structural isomers that contain some water as ligand and thiocyanate up to 6 (or 4) ligands, the rest as unbounded anions and molecules.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2005, 02:39:24 AM by AWK »
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