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Topic: Defintions  (Read 5303 times)

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AirJordan

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Defintions
« on: April 09, 2005, 01:53:10 AM »
Hey I was reading my text book for chemistry. And I wasn't really getting the meanings of these words. Can someone please define some words for me in the "stupid" way. Like easy words. Thanks!

~Dipole Movement (Dipole Dipole)
~London Forces
~Hydrogen Bond
« Last Edit: April 09, 2005, 05:53:42 AM by hmx9123 »

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Deffintions
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2005, 02:23:46 AM »
how come your textbook don't define these terms? dodgy, isnt it?
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Offline hmx9123

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Re:Defintions
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2005, 05:56:04 AM »
Are you sure you don't mean 'dipole moment'?

In addition, what does your textbook have to say about these terms?  I would be more inclined to give you some help here if you could be more specific about your lack of understanding what your text has to say.  Otherwise I'd just be giving answers away to homework without any real learning occurring.  These terms are all related by the fact that they describe intermolecular forces.  What exactly are you confused about?

AirJordan

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Re:Defintions
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2005, 06:27:23 PM »
Well it does it say it, but it used these terms which are not understandable. Like I know what it kinda means

Like dipole movement, is something like these 2 bonds coming together

Hydrogen bond is something that is a bond that is together with hydrogen

And london forces is the weakest of them all, it is random. like it moves at random and it will attract with each other.

Thats what I got from the text book. Is it the right terms...

AirJordan

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Re:Defintions
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2005, 11:15:53 AM »
Can someone tell me if I am right, please...

Offline Mitch

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Re:Defintions
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2005, 06:41:08 PM »
Your first one is incorrect. Your second and third is more or less correct.
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AirJordan

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Re:Defintions
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2005, 12:28:12 AM »
Alright thanks man, that was all I needed to know if I was at least correct

Offline Mitch

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Re:Defintions
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2005, 01:30:37 AM »
no problem man  ;)
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