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Topic: emission spectrum of the hydrogen atom  (Read 3830 times)

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Offline ainoko_hikaru

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emission spectrum of the hydrogen atom
« on: August 01, 2008, 11:34:50 AM »
hello. i've been asked by my professor to solve a problem. i know how to attack it by using rydberg's constant, but she insists that we use B instead of RH. she didn't say what B is. I tried searching it but found nothing. help, please. it's not balmer though, i think. our topic is about bohr's theory of the hydrogen atom. the equation i'm talking about is emission spectrum of the hydrogen atom.

the equation is:

    En = -RH * (1/n2)

Offline macman104

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Re: emission spectrum of the hydrogen atom
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2008, 11:47:54 AM »
Could it be the einstein coefficient?  I have no idea about any of this, just random guessing...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_spectral_line

Offline ainoko_hikaru

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Re: emission spectrum of the hydrogen atom
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2008, 11:55:22 AM »
uhm... maybe... i forgot to mention that the problem involves photons. the formula i used (the actual one) was

delta E = hv = RH * [(1/ni2) - (1/nf2)]

what she showed is

delta E = hv = B * [(1/ni2) - (1/nf2)]

not that this might change my question though.

thanks for the guess, macman104...

Offline Mitch

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Re: emission spectrum of the hydrogen atom
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2008, 03:51:23 AM »
Rh is kinda fun to derive for yourself, this might be what she is trying to convey.
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