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Topic: Difference between ionic Bonds and covalent bonds  (Read 13426 times)

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Corvettaholic

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Difference between ionic Bonds and covalent bonds
« on: April 23, 2004, 06:58:16 PM »
I'm not too clear on the difference between an ionic bond, and a covalent bond... whats the difference? Covalent I'm clueless, but isn't ionic when one atom coughs up an electron and another atom snatches it up and they're buddies from then on?


Edit: edited title for better indexing. Mitch
« Last Edit: April 24, 2004, 07:13:17 PM by Mitch »

Offline Mitch

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Re:Bonds
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2004, 07:30:13 PM »
In a covalent bond they share the electron. H2 is the perfect example of such a perfect sharing of electrons.
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Corvettaholic

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Re:Bonds
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2004, 07:33:29 PM »
OK that makes sense, but lets take NaCl, even though one is losing an electron and the other is gaining one... the electron is still present. So aren't they sharing it too?

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Re:Bonds
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2004, 07:36:28 PM »
No their not sharing it, you can think of their attraction as simple an electrostatic attraction to a first approximation.
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Corvettaholic

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Re:Bonds
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2004, 07:37:53 PM »
Gotcha, so thats why covalent bonds are stronger. In covalent, both atoms are latched onto those poor electrons for dear life, where in an ionic bond, they just like being around each other like opposite pole magnets.

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Re:Bonds
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2004, 07:50:27 PM »
How do you determine beforehand what bonds are going to be ionic or covalent in a reaction?
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Re:Bonds
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2004, 08:22:38 PM »
Scratch: Electronegativity. Similiar electronegativities means a covalent bond is formed.
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Re:Bonds
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2004, 08:27:02 PM »
So nonsimilars form ionic?
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Re:Bonds
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2004, 09:29:28 PM »
nope, if they have similar electronegativities like c-n c-h they still form covalent bonds.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Bonds
« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2004, 01:28:13 PM »
Gotcha, so thats why covalent bonds are stronger. In covalent, both atoms are latched onto those poor electrons for dear life, where in an ionic bond, they just like being around each other like opposite pole magnets.

Well.. u cant guage covalent bond stronger based on e nature of the bond..
« Last Edit: April 27, 2004, 08:28:53 AM by geodome »
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Corvettaholic

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Re:Difference between ionic Bonds and covalent bonds
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2004, 01:20:03 PM »
I've always heard that covalent bonds are stronger than ionic, or is that just a generalization?

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Difference between ionic Bonds and covalent bonds
« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2004, 08:32:01 AM »
I never heard of such generalisation. Perhaps it's a misconception raised from the fact that most covalent compounds have lower melting point than their ionic counterparts. It must be noted that melting involves breaking the strong electrostatic attraction between the ions in ionic compound and in the case of simple covalent molecules, it's just overcoming Van Der Waals' forces, London forces, Hydrogen bonding (any form of inter-molecular bonding).
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

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