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Topic: Corrosives  (Read 25038 times)

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Offline Arkcon

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Re: Corrosives
« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2008, 03:37:06 PM »
And steel is mostly iron.. I think I finally understand lol. This is completely of topic but I dont want to make a whole new thread for a simple question. I have looked on google and cant find and answer. At what tempreture do diamonds melt at? and once there melted what are the transported in?

You are making the same mistake you've made before, expecting a very simple answer, to a very difficult problem.  A similar question was asked before, look here:

http://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?topic=27366.msg111260#msg111260

Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline uperkurk

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Re: Corrosives
« Reply #31 on: December 15, 2008, 05:48:49 PM »
I understand that once something like that melts it will harden again, he was asking how to make it stay as liquid. I dont know the exact tempreture but lets just say if I place some steel or iron into a furnace it would melt. At anypoint if I put a diamond in that furnace, even a furnace that it heated to say 5000 degrees. Would it melt or not?

Offline Arkcon

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Re: Corrosives
« Reply #32 on: December 16, 2008, 12:31:26 PM »
No.  Some things don't melt no matter how hot they get.  For example, CO2 and I2 sublime, go straight to the gas phase, unless under pressure.  Also some things decompose when heated, like wood, this is also what happens to diamond, it becomes a vapor of C atoms, as was described in the forum post I linked to, and the quote from wikipedia azmanam: included.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline nj_bartel

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Re: Corrosives
« Reply #33 on: December 16, 2008, 12:50:54 PM »
Melting diamonds is sort of a misnomer at any rate - a diamond is separated from graphite is separated from buckminsterfullerenes by how the carbons bond to one another.  If it's in a liquid, these bonds disappear, and who's to say how they will reform.

Offline uperkurk

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Re: Corrosives
« Reply #34 on: December 16, 2008, 01:32:37 PM »
Ok, using wood was a good example :) It dont melt it just burns. I didnt think of that, because I look at diamond as a type of rock I thought it would melt like concrete turns to lava.. ok thanks for all the help I was proberbly getting on your nerves asking so many questions lol. Thanks again.

Offline Arkcon

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Re: Corrosives
« Reply #35 on: December 16, 2008, 03:01:16 PM »
Ok, using wood was a good example :) It dont melt it just burns.

Aha.  See, I never mentioned that -- because if I'd said it burns, you'd have just said, "What if there was no air?", then we'd get into a discussion on destructive distillation, and other oxidizing agents besides the oxygen in air, to prolong the discussion. ;D
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline uperkurk

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Re: Corrosives
« Reply #36 on: December 17, 2008, 07:59:25 AM »
lol I think I have all the answers I was looking for lol, I dont have a clue what your talking about so i'll just leave the convo here. Thanks ;D

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