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Topic: Basic Question regarding Hess's Law  (Read 2474 times)

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Offline Zoloft

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Basic Question regarding Hess's Law
« on: January 14, 2009, 04:41:12 PM »
OK, so if I had C3H8(g) + 5O2(g) ---> 3CO2(g) + 4H2O(g)

And I needed to find how much heat is released by burning 10 moles of propane, I would have to balance the equation, and in turn, that would give me like 10C3H8 +50O2 ---> 30CO2 + 40H20.

Anyway, I would then use Hess's equation and subtract the heat released by each reactant in their standard states (by multiplying by the moles per elements) from the heat released by their products.

Right?

Offline Astrokel

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Re: Basic Question regarding Hess's Law
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2009, 03:05:13 AM »
You are correct if you are using deltaHf. Alternatively, if you have got enthalpy change of your combustion of per mole of propane, you could just multiply it by 10.
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Offline Mitch

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Re: Basic Question regarding Hess's Law
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2009, 03:15:41 AM »
You can also factor out a 10 out of your coefficients. ;)
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