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Topic: most reactive element  (Read 17990 times)

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Offline meenu

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most reactive element
« on: January 17, 2009, 03:40:46 AM »
Which is the most reactive element in the periodic table
&
Which is the least reactive element in periodic table


as we know

FOR METALS

reactivity increases down group
reactivity decreases from left to right

FOR NON METALS

reactivity decreases down group
reactivity increases from left to right

how to compare metals and non metals reactivity  ???


Offline Mitch

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Re: most reactive element
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2009, 03:46:00 AM »
Reactive with what?
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Offline Arkcon

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Re: most reactive element
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2009, 09:51:35 AM »
You can look at the table itself, for trends, based on what you already know for some elements, and maybe make some guesses.
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Offline TheJoker

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Re: most reactive element
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2009, 12:34:41 AM »
I would say most reactive element is Francium and most nonreactive element is Helium

Offline Fleaker

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Re: most reactive element
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2009, 02:53:20 PM »
I don't understand the point of this post. Is it a question or a statement, or what?


Most reactive is situational and depends on temperature/pressure/purity etc.

I.e. cesium is the most reactive metal, or element for that matter, when it comes its reaction with water. Lithium, however, is arguably more reactive with things like glass or silica. I can distill cesium in quartz. I cannot distill lithium in quartz.

Neither flask nor beaker.

Offline rocketparrotlet

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Re: most reactive element
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2009, 03:28:39 PM »
If, by "most reactive", you mean most electronegative/electropositive, you have already answered your own question.

The most electronegative element is fluorine.  It is considered the most "reactive" element because of this.  Fluorine is able to generate extremely exothermic reactions with many substances.

The "least reactive" element would probably be helium, as it is entirely stable in the first electron layer.  Therefore, the most closely-bonded electron layer is stable, and outer layers cannot react.

Hope this helps.

Offline Loyal

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Re: most reactive element
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2009, 01:58:31 AM »
To be honest I would rather throw a pound of Francium into water than I would touch a box full of fluorine.
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Offline Arkcon

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Re: most reactive element
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2009, 06:28:28 AM »
To be honest I would rather throw a pound of Francium into water than I would touch a box full of fluorine.

Can you actually acquire the selected quantities and containers of each?  Moot point, really.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

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