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Topic: Conductometric Titrations  (Read 4517 times)

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teachicken

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Conductometric Titrations
« on: May 14, 2005, 12:40:44 PM »
In the experiment, HCl (10.0 cm3, 0.1 M) were pipetted into a 250 cm3 beaker.
Approximately 100 cm3 of distilled water were added.
The conductance of the solution was observed upon the addition of 0.10 M NaOH solution using a conductivity meter.

The question is:
Why is 100 cm3 of distilled water added to the HCl in the beaker?
(Apart from the need to have sufficient solution to immerse the electrodes)

I think the addition of distilled water is to make the total volume of the solution large so that the volume of portions of NaOH added will be insignificant.
But why do we need to do this?
Are there any other reasons?

Offline Borek

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Re:Conductometric Titrations
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2005, 02:15:53 PM »
I think the addition of distilled water is to make the total volume of the solution large so that the volume of portions of NaOH added will be insignificant.
But why do we need to do this?

Think about the effect dilution due to NaOH addition will have on the measurements.
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