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Topic: Question about delta as notation for unsaturated bonds?  (Read 3083 times)

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Offline 1112

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Question about delta as notation for unsaturated bonds?
« on: March 25, 2009, 12:58:42 AM »
I am reading a book on total synthesis. I do not know what a type of notation used for unsaturated bonds means. The notation is  :delta:(triangle)1,2. I picked 1,2 arbitrarily. Here is an example from the book:

"Saturation of the electron-deficient  :delta:14,15 double bond in 30 with hydrogen in the presence of palladium on charcoal provides, as the major product, cis ester 31 and a small amount of the isomeric trans ester."

Offline macman104

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Re: Question about delta as notation for unsaturated bonds?
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2009, 01:53:50 AM »
Can you draw that compound 30 that is in the book?  I would imagine that means the bond between C14 and 15, but I can't say I've seen it before.

Offline azmanam

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Re: Question about delta as notation for unsaturated bonds?
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2009, 06:41:47 AM »
yes, it's a double bond between those carbons (starting from the carboxylic acid).  This is common in fatty acids.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatty_acid#Nomenclature
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