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Topic: Thermite reactions  (Read 36757 times)

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Corvettaholic

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Re:Thermite reactions
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2004, 01:28:45 PM »
Well containing the sparks is easy. Its an enclosed housing with a bunch of holes drilled in it for pressure/heat vents. At this point, I don't plan on dumping anything in there, other than more reactants. Not getting killed is the idea, and I'm not dumb enough to try and build this on a normal scale before I do some really tiny simulations, like with 1g or something. When I do get it working, I'll let you guys know how it turns out. Still haven't had time to get a hold of the ATF (which I will do first) due to military duty.

nfstanley

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Re:Thermite reactions
« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2004, 09:34:00 PM »
Well containing the sparks is easy. Its an enclosed housing with a bunch of holes drilled in it for pressure/heat vents. At this point, I don't plan on dumping anything in there, other than more reactants. Not getting killed is the idea, and I'm not dumb enough to try and build this on a normal scale before I do some really tiny simulations, like with 1g or something. When I do get it working, I'll let you guys know how it turns out. Still haven't had time to get a hold of the ATF (which I will do first) due to military duty.

If you want to melt iron in any quantity, why not build a small blast furnace or electric arc furnace?  Look for a place that sells foundry supplies; there used to be one that regularly advertised in the Popular Science classifieds; I'm not sure if it still does.

Norm

Corvettaholic

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Re:Thermite reactions
« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2004, 02:14:32 AM »
Blast furnace, electric arc furnace... please do tell. I have no idea how these things work, but I've heard of blast furnaces before. Gimmie a quick rundown of the process works, and I'll dig up what I can at work tomorrow. Then I'll be back with plenty of questions (as usual)  ;D

nfstanley

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Re:Thermite reactions
« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2004, 10:01:48 PM »
Blast furnace, electric arc furnace... please do tell. I have no idea how these things work, but I've heard of blast furnaces before. Gimmie a quick rundown of the process works, and I'll dig up what I can at work tomorrow. Then I'll be back with plenty of questions (as usual)  ;D

I apologize for taking so long to get back to you.  As you probably know, a blast furnace uses forced air from a blower to speed up combustion of the fuel (usually gas for a small casting furnace) to achieve a high temperature.  The combustion chamber is well-insuated by a refractory lining.  Here is a link to a company that supplies materials for small commercial and hobbyist foundries:  <www.budgetcastingsupply.com>.  Their site includes a link to a web ring of metal casting hobbyists which is the place to go for info on building small furnaces.

An electric arc furnace uses an arc between carbon electrodes to melt metals.  This is probably the simplest way to generate the high temperature (1535 C) to melt iron.  The carbons can be obtained at your local welding supply store, and an arc welder used to supply the current.  I once built a simple furnace from two fire bricks hollowed out to form the melting chamber, and this easily melted a few ounces of scrap iron.

All this is probably too off-topic for a chemistry forum.  If you have any further questions you can E-mail me at nfs@midcoast.com.

Norm  

Offline billnotgatez

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Re:Thermite reactions
« Reply #19 on: April 25, 2004, 07:37:53 PM »
Thought this might be an alternative
 Coffee Can Foundry
http://www.visi.com/%7Edarus/foundry2

Corvettaholic

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Re:Thermite reactions
« Reply #20 on: April 26, 2004, 01:36:35 PM »
Very good information! As soon as finish painting my house, I'm going to get started on this!

phr0z3n

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Re:Thermite reactions
« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2004, 03:36:05 AM »
Hey guys, im suppose to do a thermite reaction for chemistry at school. I have to do a demonstration in front of an audience. But i had to test it today, {edited for content}. The school couldn’t get me {edited for content}.

I then attempted to ignite it {edited for content}.

Any help would be greatly appreciated
« Last Edit: April 30, 2004, 04:48:55 AM by hmx9123 »

Offline hmx9123

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Re:Thermite reactions
« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2004, 04:50:15 AM »
Quote
Hey guys, im suppose to do a thermite reaction for chemistry at school.

Somehow, I doubt this.  However, that being said, we don't allow posts of dangerous compositions on these forums.  What you describe could be very dangerous.  So, here's some safety tips:

1. Don't go looking for information on the internet.  It's nothing but a shortcut and it's not reliable.

2. You asked in your post about Al particle size (before it was edited); it seems that you're looking for shortcuts, because you didn't read the second post in this thread carefully--particle size is mentioned.  Take the time to do this right, and look it up someplace.  The thermite reaction is so common that you can find an abundance of information on it if you just go to the library.

3. Go to a college chemistry library.  Even if you have to ask the desk clerk there what you're looking for, you'll wind up with more reliable information than the internet.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2004, 05:33:10 AM by hmx9123 »

Offline Mitch

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Re:Thermite reactions
« Reply #23 on: April 30, 2004, 05:20:55 AM »
[satire]I have this nuclear bomb my physics teacher wants me to demonstrate in class can you help me out? Where can I get some uranium, preferably weapon grade?[/satire]
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