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Topic: The problem of components  (Read 4472 times)

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Offline ksr985

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The problem of components
« on: May 24, 2005, 12:21:38 PM »
Can anyone please tell me how many components there are in an unsaturated solution of NaH2PO4 in water? and how different is this example from, say, an unsaturated solution of Na2HPO4 in water?
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Offline Borek

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Re:The problem of components
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2005, 06:42:49 PM »
Same forms in both cases (ions and uncharged particles), different concentrations. To list all forms is not a problem. To calculate the concentrations... see here:

http://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?board=2;action=display;threadid=3330

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Offline ksr985

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Re:The problem of components
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2005, 02:51:42 PM »
um, could you please elaborate. i want to know what C will be, if i have to apply gibbs phase rule to the system. F=C-P+2
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Offline Dude

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Re:The problem of components
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2005, 05:02:53 PM »
My recollection is that individual species are not included if they can recombine to form the salt.  C would be two in both cases: water and salt in an unsaturated solution.

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