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Topic: Order these bonding types in order of strength ...  (Read 25447 times)

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Offline bec036

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Order these bonding types in order of strength ...
« on: May 31, 2009, 02:42:40 AM »
anyone know the order of these 6 bonding types in order of decreasing strength. 

  • Hydrogen Bonding
  • Covalet Bonding
  • Ionic Bonding
  • Dipole-Dipole Bonding
  • Dispersion forces
  • Metallic Bonding


  :D thanks.


Offline UG

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Re: Order these bonding types in order of strength ...
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2009, 03:19:21 AM »
Why don't you have a go first and we'll go from there?

Offline bec036

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Re: Order these bonding types in order of strength ...
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2009, 03:42:17 AM »
ok here goes...

Hydrogen
Covalent
Metallic
Ionic
Dipole-Dipole
Dispersion

how'd i go?

Offline Kendo Ichimaru

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Re: Order these bonding types in order of strength ...
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2009, 09:00:26 AM »
Hey,

Generally the strong bonds are Ionic bonds, Covalent bonds, and Metallic bonds (in no order of strength). Large amount of energy is required to actually break these strong bonds. These bonds are intramolecular bonds, and are very much stronger than the intermolecular forces such as Hydrogen bonds, or the Van Der Waals forces, i.e. Permanent dipole-Permanent dipole interactions and dispersion forces (Induced dipole-Induced dipole attractions).

The strength of the intermolecular forces of attraction are in this order generally: Hydrogen bonds (around 10 times stronger than an average Van Der Waals attraction) followed by Van Der Waals attraction. Hydrogen bonds are bonds which are formed from a highly electronegative element (F, O or N) together with a considerable bare proton, H. *note that Cl cant form hydrogen bonds due to its size. Permanent dipole-Permanent dipole attraction is usually stronger and found only when there is a net dipole moment on each molecule, i.e. polar molecules. However, a non-polar molecule with high polarisability may induce a dispersion force stronger than some Permanent dipole-Permanent dipole interactions due the large space occupied by its electron cloud, usually indicates high Mr. The large electron cloud implies more ease of distortion of the electrons within the cloud and that leads to a greater induced dipole.

Thus the strength of the bonds will be (Ionic bonds, Covalent bonds, Metallic bonds), Hydrogen bonds, (Permanent dipole-Permanent dipole interactions, Dispersion forces).

*Strength of bonds of each set depends on factors like size of bonding atoms, internuclear distance etc.

*Dispersion forces can also be named as London forces or Induced dipole-Induced dipole attraction.

Hope it helped abit..  :)

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