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Topic: Which Inorganic Chemistry is the best?  (Read 13690 times)

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Offline staphlee

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Which Inorganic Chemistry is the best?
« on: August 25, 2009, 12:12:10 AM »
Hi all, anyone know which inorganic chemistry textbook is the best? recently I want to start to read the book and want to know which one i should read. Any recommendation? Thanks.

Offline sjb

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Re: Which Inorganic Chemistry is the best?
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2009, 02:02:04 AM »
Hi all, anyone know which inorganic chemistry textbook is the best? recently I want to start to read the book and want to know which one i should read. Any recommendation? Thanks.

Define "best". What sort of level are you looking at, and for any particular course?

Offline staphlee

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Re: Which Inorganic Chemistry is the best?
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2009, 12:27:14 AM »
I am a graduate student. My inorganic chemistry background is not strong. I want to review some inorganic textbooks. Anyone can suggest a good book to cover most of important theory that inorganic chemists should know or which book has better sections? Recommending one or more textbooks for me will be good and maybe can address which parts in which are better. Thank you.

Offline sjb

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Re: Which Inorganic Chemistry is the best?
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2009, 04:24:58 PM »
For the advanced parts of my undergraduate degree, I used either Cotton and Wilkinson (as was) or Greenwood and Earnshaw, with perhaps more specialist texts from the library as appropriate. Not specialising specifically in that area, I'm not sure what is if you like prerequisites for a Ph.D. or similar in inorganic, though the two books I've mentioned have similar analogues in organic, which is more my area.

Offline Sam (NG)

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Re: Which Inorganic Chemistry is the best?
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2009, 05:33:18 PM »
For the advanced parts of my undergraduate degree, I used either Cotton and Wilkinson (as was) or Greenwood and Earnshaw, with perhaps more specialist texts from the library as appropriate. Not specialising specifically in that area, I'm not sure what is if you like prerequisites for a Ph.D. or similar in inorganic, though the two books I've mentioned have similar analogues in organic, which is more my area.

Of the two I think perhaps Greenwood & Earnshaw is a little more accessible for the uninitiated, then if it doesn't have what you want on a particular topic, you could try Cotton & Wilkinson.  Personally, I've always found C & W a little tough going unless you're looking for a very specific subject.

Offline staphlee

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Re: Which Inorganic Chemistry is the best?
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2009, 12:26:35 AM »
Could anyone address which books are more basic and general, and which are more advanced?
Like, Cotton's book has a lot of descriptive element chemistry but lack the basic theory introduction, e.g. crystal/ligand filed theory, MO, some important theory in Inorganic chemistry.
Thank you.

Offline Sam (NG)

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Re: Which Inorganic Chemistry is the best?
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2009, 05:10:21 AM »
Could anyone address which books are more basic and general, and which are more advanced?
Like, Cotton's book has a lot of descriptive element chemistry but lack the basic theory introduction, e.g. crystal/ligand filed theory, MO, some important theory in Inorganic chemistry.
Thank you.


If you want basic theory, I'd try Shriver & Atkins' Inorganic Chemistry.

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