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Topic: thalium stability  (Read 4930 times)

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Offline Rayan

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thalium stability
« on: June 10, 2005, 03:44:11 PM »
why is Tl+ more stable than Tl3+?
 
and is Tl more stable than Tl3+ ?
i thought that:
cations are smaller than neurtal atoms
and E = z/r => as r decreases, the energy increases so stability decreases so the Tl is more stable than
Tl3+. is it correct like this?
« Last Edit: June 11, 2005, 08:52:43 AM by rayan »

Offline Mitch

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Re:thalium stability
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2005, 01:54:00 PM »
What do you mean Tl+ is stable? Does Tl3+ explode or something?
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Offline Rayan

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Re:thalium stability
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2005, 04:45:09 PM »
i dont really know what they mean, i was studying for my final exam and it was a question in last year's final!

Daniel_Imp_Col_UK

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Re:thalium stability
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2005, 12:22:34 AM »
Rayan,

I am sure the stability of this lower oxidation state can be explained in terms of the inert pair effect. As we move down the group, bond energies decrease and are not enough to compensate for the promotional energy, and hence the lower oxidation state whereby the S electrons adopt a non bonding role is favoured.


AgG

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Re:thalium stability
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2005, 04:00:35 AM »
Tl+ has a d10 closed shell

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