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Topic: chemistry/Periodic table  (Read 4103 times)

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andre

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chemistry/Periodic table
« on: June 12, 2005, 02:22:00 PM »
It would be very nice if someone could help me. :)
My question is; what is the influence of the position of an element in the periodic table on formation and commercial uses of its compunds? like aluminium, type of bond in its compunds and what influences the type of bond formed.

 :)

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Re:chemistry/Periodic table
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2005, 02:24:50 PM »
The electronegativity difference of the elements will determine the types of bonds formed. If its a large difference it will be ionic if its a small difference it will be covalent.
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Re:chemistry/Periodic table
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2005, 03:38:22 PM »
It would be very nice if someone could help me. :)
My question is; what is the influence of the position of an element in the periodic table on formation and commercial uses of its compunds? like aluminium, type of bond in its compunds and what influences the type of bond formed.

 :)
As a rule of thumb, you can say that the more you go downwards in the periodic table, the more metal-like an element is (the more electropositive). The same holds, when you go to the left. So, at the top-right part you have the true non-metals, the "half-metals", metalloids, which are somewhere between a metal and a non-metal are boron, silicon + germanium, antimony, tellurium (and possibly astatine, but with the latter I'm not sure).

The transition metal forms a group on their own. These are metals, but they also can have typical non-metal properties, such as having acidic oxides (e.g. chromium, vanadium, manganese). The transition metals can have multiple oxidation states, with the lower oxidation states typical metal-like and the higher oxidation states typical non-metal like. These special properties of the transition metals are the basis of many modern commercial applications as catalysts. Most (if not all) modern catalysts in chemical industry, but also in cars, are transition metal compounds.
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