October 25, 2020, 03:06:00 PM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Wide liquid range liquids  (Read 4680 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

mynode

  • Guest
Wide liquid range liquids
« on: June 13, 2005, 07:56:27 AM »
I’m searching for a liquid with a liquid range from as close to room temperature as possible to perhaps 800 C though I could probably work with something with a smaller range. The liquid would need to be inert in a propane-air combustion environment and preferably something that wouldn’t produce toxic fumes if some boiling or decomposition occurred.

I’ve considered using tin or a eutectic alloy, but I suspect that some oxide formation would be inevitable and I'd like to avoid that.

I’m wondering if there is some kind of eutectic silicate or molten salt that might be suitable, but I don’t have access to the data.  I know there is a lot of research taking place like the CALPHAD project, but I can’t find any publicly available data.

Can anyone suggest a solution (no pun intended) or point me to some public resources either online or in references I would be likely to find at a library?

Offline Donaldson Tan

  • Editor, New Asia Republic
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3178
  • Mole Snacks: +261/-12
  • Gender: Male
    • New Asia Republic
Re:Wide liquid range liquids
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2005, 10:20:12 AM »
try solder?
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

mynode

  • Guest
Re:Wide liquid range liquids
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2005, 03:53:17 PM »
Solder is an eutectic alloy.  It might work, but I was concerned about oxide formation if the liquid solder is exposed to oxygen.  I might do some expermenting to see how great the tendency is.  I am really hoping to find something that is completely inert.

Offline xiankai

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 786
  • Mole Snacks: +77/-37
  • Gender: Male
Re:Wide liquid range liquids
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2005, 08:45:11 PM »
a week ago, i was participating in a solder workshop

they told us solder had like 60% tin and 40% lead, so i think its qutie hazardous. (we had to wash our hands after handling it) though it has a low melting point (200 C), im not sure about the boiling point.

it gives off some toxic fumes, and since i had to lean near to the solder to see how well it had soldered, i got a nasty whiff of the pungent smell :P

and that was with working with a thin wire of solder, trying to work with liquid solder would probably be giving off alot of fumes. also becareful, because solder can splash around. i've had a few on my hands, but they do no lasting harm.
one learns best by teaching

Offline jdurg

  • Banninator
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1366
  • Mole Snacks: +106/-23
  • Gender: Male
  • I am NOT a freak.
Re:Wide liquid range liquids
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2005, 12:12:00 PM »
Gallium metal is completely non-toxic and has a melting point a few degrees above room temperature.  If you hold some solid Ga in your hand it will melt into a puddle.  It's boiling point is also extremely high, so it has a very wide liquid range.  However, it will oxidize over time and I'm not sure if that would go against what you are looking for.  (In reality, all liquid metal compositions will oxidize).
"A real fart is beefy, has a density greater than or equal to the air surrounding it, consists

Sponsored Links