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Topic: Help with sythesizing Sodium  (Read 23310 times)

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Seymor-Omnis

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Help with sythesizing Sodium
« on: March 17, 2004, 12:37:09 PM »
I have a question about a reaction with sodium chloride(NaCl).

2NaCl + Ca --> CaCl2 + 2Na

Is there any other catalysts needed to create this reaction?  Also if this reaction is impossible I would like to understand why because I believe calcium is more reactive than sodium.

Thank for all the *delete me*!




Edit: Edited subject title so we can index it better. Mitch
« Last Edit: March 18, 2004, 03:17:49 PM by Mitch »

Offline Mitch

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2004, 01:16:22 PM »
One of the key catalyst for this reaction is heat. You need to use molten Calcium to accomplish it, I believe. For single replacement reactions I too think Calcium is more reactive than Sodium, but not by much.
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Seymor-Omnis

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2004, 05:03:39 PM »
    OK, I will run this by my Chemistry II teacher, maybe I can convince her to try this reaction  ;D, that is if we can supply that much heat  :-\.  

Also, if you know, how are we going to remove the sodium from the Calcium Chloride?  I would like any information on the subject, thanks again!!
« Last Edit: March 17, 2004, 05:15:22 PM by Seymor-Omnis »

Offline Mitch

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2004, 05:15:25 PM »
It might just be easier to do an electrolysis on molten sodium hydroxide. Just have to cut the sodium off one of the electrodes.
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Seymor-Omnis

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2004, 05:29:58 PM »
Would a NORMAL high school science lab have that kind of equiment?  

Offline Mitch

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2004, 05:37:06 PM »
you can but sodium hydroxide, which is lye from a drugstore, you can get copper wire for an electrode at a hardware store and a 9v battery is found most anywhere.

I can't stress how dangerous this is. The sodium that is made can spontaneously catch on fire from the heat generated in this reaction. If you are going to do this, only use a view pellets of Sodium hydroxide and make a few milligrams of sodium to begin with.

If you want sodium you can get it from a chemical distributor or even off e-bay these days.
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Seymor-Omnis

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2004, 10:11:23 PM »
I wasn't expecting the reactions to be all safe, that is one reason Sodium has caught my eye.  We don't have a whole lot of exciting experiments in high school, sure a 6 molar HCl solution can eat your face off, but nothing spectacular happens when you mix it whith baking soda, just some fizzing.

I have considered buying the Sodium, but I want the experience of this experiment for my own knowledge, besides don't I need some sort of permit to buy the Sodium anyways?

BTW, if I do do this experiment I will be very careful, wouldn't want to be blind or losing limbs now would I :P?

Offline Mitch

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2004, 10:20:04 PM »
It is wonderful that you are interested in Chemistry being so young. One aspect of the website is meant to tap into the amateur Chemist at heart. Hence the citizen chemist board

Some other safety precautions about the experiment, molten NaOH has a tendency to splash every now and then. I know I got some on my hands, and thankfully I was wearing gloves. Also, some landed on my shirt, and now I have a nice hole there.

By the way you have a message in your inbox :P
« Last Edit: March 17, 2004, 10:20:49 PM by Mitch »
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Seymor-Omnis

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2004, 10:23:31 PM »
Thans for all the ideas, ill make sure to bring gloves and other things when i do this experiment, may be a shirt...anyways, thanks for the input.

You can expect lots more posts from me, I am thinking about majoring in Chemistry, either that or Physics...decisions decisions  ::)

Offline Mitch

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2004, 10:34:56 PM »
You can always post your results in the Citizen Chemist board along with whatever else you end up doing. :)
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2004, 12:54:48 PM »
The reactivity series is as follow: K, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Zn, Fe, Pb, Ag, Au..

Calcium is definitely less reactive than Sodium.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Seymor-Omnis

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2004, 01:30:20 PM »
How different is the reactivity of Sodium and Calcium, because I thought that sodium was less reactive?  I also didn't think to check b/c of what was said above. ???

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Re:A question about a reaction
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2004, 02:01:14 PM »
I think you guys are getting your rules for reactivity for single-replacement reactions mixed up with the reaction type above. Its a bit more complicated then a single replacement reaction, I think.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Help with sythesizing Sodium
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2004, 03:01:02 AM »
Shouldnt this be a case of displacement reaction whereby the more reactive metal will displace the less reactive one? If not, what is it? Please enlighten us =D
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Offline Mitch

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Re:Help with sythesizing Sodium
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2004, 04:12:29 AM »
I think Calcium is just acting as a reducing agent? I'm not really sure now, you guys are confusing me. :P
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