February 27, 2021, 02:16:35 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Mixing liquids terms  (Read 13061 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

walters

  • Guest
Mixing liquids terms
« on: June 14, 2005, 06:53:35 PM »

 What is it called in chemistry when im mixing liquids?

 What is it called in Chemistry the sequence of putting the liquids a special order?

 If i change the sequence/order of putting in the liquids in the cup/jar what is this called in chemistry?

 What are some basic mixing techniques in chemistry?

 I know this is different mixing techniques i just need to know the terms
 or how to do these different mixing techniques?

Offline madscientist

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 225
  • Mole Snacks: +14/-7
  • University of New England Australia
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2005, 05:26:14 PM »
Try a google search mate, or the index in your text book.
be more specific and the chem genius's on this site will be able to point you in the right direction.

cheers,

madscientist
The only stupid question is a question not asked.

Offline Donaldson Tan

  • Editor, New Asia Republic
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3178
  • Mole Snacks: +261/-13
  • Gender: Male
    • New Asia Republic
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2005, 06:58:32 PM »
when you mix two liquids, there might be a chemical reaction that poses a hazard to your safety.

eg. never add water to concentrated sulphuric acid. the hydration of sulphuric acid is exothermic and may create a hazardous sulphuric acid mist. instead, add concentrated sulphuric acid to water. the heat evolved from hydration is absorbed by the large volume of water, so no sulphuric acid mist is formed.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

walters

  • Guest
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2005, 08:02:47 PM »

 When mixing is it called Homogeneous mixing and mixing the Emulsion layers
 i think these are the terms can you guys explain more about
 this homogeneous mixing and emulsion layering effects

Offline constant thinker

  • mad scientist
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1275
  • Mole Snacks: +85/-45
  • Gender: Male
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2005, 08:35:26 PM »
You have heterogenous mixtures also. And you have suspension although thats solids in liquids.  Homogenous means that it's like one mixture. Heterogenous mixtures you can c different components of the it.

Ex.
Milk; When it's unhomogenized it seperates into cream and water. That wouldn't be a homogenous solution.
"The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.' " -Ronald Reagan

"I'm for anything that gets you through the night, be it prayer, tranquilizers, or a bottle of Jack Daniels." -Frank Sinatra

walters

  • Guest
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2005, 10:02:20 PM »

What is suspension?    although thats solids in liquids.  

Homogenous means that it's like one mixture.

Heterogenous mixtures you can see different components of the it.

Whats the difference between a Homogenous mixers VS a Heterogenous mixture?

When i pour 5 different liquids in a Cup/jar is that Heterogenous?

How do i do Homogenous mixing?
How do i do Heterogenous mxing?



Benzene265

  • Guest
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2005, 11:05:51 PM »
Pictures help.

Homogeneous:


Think clear, not colorless.

Heterogeneous:


Think cloudy.  Also called a suspension.

When you mix something together in chem class, it's just called mixing.  We're not that pretentious.  You usually mix things together to make them react with each other and form a product.  When you're mixing things together in a specific order, you're most likely doing several reactions to get  to a specific product from specific reactants.  You'll do this a lot in organic chem.  Otherwise, I have no idea what you mean by mixing techniques.

walters

  • Guest
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2005, 01:29:36 AM »

Homogenous emulsion layer?
Heterogenous emulsion layer?

Homogenous mixing- is clear and colorless

Heterogenous mixing? has color

What is the order/sequence called in chemistry?
 The order/sequence of put the liquids in the cup/jar

 It i switch the order/sequence the "result" is different why?
 what is this called?
 

Offline xiankai

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 786
  • Mole Snacks: +77/-37
  • Gender: Male
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2005, 04:29:50 AM »
An emulsion is a mixture of two immiscible (unblendable) substances.

colour is entirely dependant on the liquids used.

Benzene265 said not to think colorless. He also said cloudy, not has color.

so, homogenous is like water and salt (can mix)

heterogenous is like charcoal and water (cannot mix, charcoal particles float around giving a "cloudy" look)

For the order/sequence of putting liquids, there's no chemical name. we just state it in basic english. its not required for u to apply this, because u're dealing with physical reactions, not chemical reactions.

if u switch the order/sequence, the result MAY be different because of chemical reactions, but it may also be due to the "process" of how the mixture changes.

 still, in the end regardless of the order/sequence, as long there are no chemical reactions, the product or result is the same.
one learns best by teaching

walters

  • Guest
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2005, 05:35:01 AM »

 1.) If i put the liquids in order in a cup/jar
     
 2,) then i toss the liquids in another cup/jar and turn it upside
      down

 3.) What happens? when i do this techique? it give a different
       result why is that ? by tossing it and turning the cup/jar
       upside down so the liquid mix alot from tossing it and turning it upside down they really mix and its looks really
 different also why is that?

walters

  • Guest
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2005, 05:37:29 AM »

 It changed the order/sequence when i tossed the liquids
 and its mixes them more why?

 

Offline xiankai

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 786
  • Mole Snacks: +77/-37
  • Gender: Male
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2005, 09:13:26 AM »
that technique is basically stirring.

it looks very different than what u'll see when u pour it slowly, because the particles of the liquid(free-flowing) roll over each other due to your vigorous shaking and hence u'll see a evenly distributed mixture.

but like i said earlier, in the end there is no difference because the liquids will settle down and u'll see a lower layer of the denser liquid and an upper layer of the less dense liquid.
one learns best by teaching

walters

  • Guest
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2005, 12:09:46 PM »
Thanks xiankai alot for helping me out and your information

Mixing techniques:

stirring: What happens to the molecules and particles of the liquids
            when im stirring?


Shaking: What happens to the molecules and particles of the liquids
            when im shaking the jar/cup?


Tossing(into another jar/cup): What happens to the molecules and particles of  the liquids when i Toss the liquids into another jar/cup?


When i toss the liquids into another jar/cup i see them overlapping and raising
and rearranging the order/sequence what is going on?

Offline xiankai

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 786
  • Mole Snacks: +77/-37
  • Gender: Male
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2005, 11:28:49 PM »
since liquid particles/molecules have no fixed arrangement and hence are able to flow over one another, they can be easily moved around.

when u stir, u are moving the particles around.

when u shake, u are also moving the particles around.

when u toss, u are still moving the particles around.

the overlapping and raising and rearranging of the order/sequence is the action of denser liquids trying to sink down, and less dense liquids trying to float up.

after u have mixed the particles, they cant possibly stay as they are because heavy(dense) liquids cant be supported upwards by lighter(less dense) liquids
one learns best by teaching

walters

  • Guest
Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2005, 12:52:47 AM »
Thanks so much Xiankai

when u stir, u are moving the particles around.
             1.) Buts its moving paricles different then shaking it?
             2.) its moving the particales diffferent then tossing it?
             3.) how is it different?

when u shake, u are also moving the particles around.
              1.) Buts its moving paricles different then Stiring it?
             2.) its moving the particales diffferent then tossing it?
             3.) how is it different?

when u toss, u are still moving the particles around.
             1.) Buts its moving paricles different then shaking it?
             2.) its moving the particales diffferent then Stiring it?
             3.) how is it different?


Sponsored Links