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Topic: Mixing liquids terms  (Read 13067 times)

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Offline xiankai

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Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2005, 05:45:43 AM »
when u stir, u're moving the particles in any direction u stir.

when u shake, u're moving the particles up and down, or left to right depending on how you shake

when u toss, the particles move down, then churn around a bit.

u shouldnt really bother about this, but of course certain factors (dont shake it like a rock star) matters, so u dont spill the contents :P
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Benzene265

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Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2005, 01:47:05 PM »
When the particles move in a liquid, no matter how you move them, they'll eventually mix together evenly.  The mixing technique depends on the container.  I'll stir if it's in a beaker, shake if it's in a test tube or volumetric flask, and swirl if it's in an Erlenmeyer flask.  Just pouring one liquid into another will let them mix slowly by turbulence.  This looks especially cool if you pour milk slowly into water.

If you're really interested in moving particles, do a google search on the Kinetic Molecular Theory and states of matter (like, liquid, for instance).  This will also be in Gen. Chem textbooks, if you prefer to read paper.

walters

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Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2005, 06:29:59 PM »
Thanks guys for the help this is some good information

i have one more topic about ice cubes

What happens when i put ice cubes in the jar/cup with 2 or 3 different kinds liquids? VS not having ice cudes and just the liquids whats the difference? what happens to the result? it changes the result?

What does the ice cudes do to the liquids?

Here is a tricky sequence/order:
"ice cubes (After) first liquid is pour into jar/cup"

1.) I put the liquid in the jar/cup
2.) I fill the jar/cup with ice cubes
3.) then i add the 2nd liquid

What happens here ? VS of just adding the ice cubes first and
fill the glass/cup/jar with ice cubes. The first liquid poured in first
before the ice cubes this changes the whole effect why? what
does adding the ice cubes AFTER the first liquid i pour VS
of just adding the ice cubes before ?

(Before) sequence/order ice cubes :

1.) Fill the glass/jar/cup with ice cubes
2.) add first liquid onto the ice cubes
3.) add the second liquid onto the ice cubes

Whats the difference between these 2 different sequence/orders?

Thanks guys for your time and information on helping me out
on this

Offline xiankai

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Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2005, 08:09:11 PM »
as before, the denser material sinks, the less dense material floats (which is why u often observe ice cubes floating on your drink, water expands when freezed)

the ice cubes, if they dont take part in any chemical reaction, will draw heat away from the liquids, because in the law of thermodynamics, all objects strive to lose/gain heat in order to attain the same heat as their surroundings.

depending on the time delayed in putting the ice cubes, the possible difference observed (excluding chemical reactions) is that the ice cube gets more time to cool down whatever is added before it (in the case of no liquids, the cup would be cooled down then)
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arnyk

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Re:Mixing liquids terms
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2005, 08:20:35 PM »
Mixing or stirring or whatever type of "motion" you set upon the liquids is basically you adding kinetic energy.  If the liquids are miscible, it will increase the rate of solubilty.  Kinda like stirring your hot chocolate after adding the powder, you are adding kinetic energy to let the powder dissolve quicker.  Heat energy also increases solubility.  This can be explained using the kinetic molecular theory.  One thing though, general temperature vs. solubility trends vary for liquids, solids, and gases.

For the ice cubes, think about their density.  Are they more dense or less dense than liquids?  If you fill the cup with liquid first and then add the ice, would the ice float or sink?  If you fill the cup with ice first and then add the liquid, where will the liquid go?  Think in terms of displacement and volume.  

The thermodynamic part of it would affect affect viscosity.  What is the relationship between temperature and viscosity?  
« Last Edit: June 18, 2005, 08:27:24 PM by arnyk »

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