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Topic: Why, if the atomic size of the ion is greater, the ionic bond is weaker?  (Read 3189 times)

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Offline lsc04361

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To determine the strength of ionic bond, it is to consider the size of the ion and the charge of the ions.

For a covalent bond, it is reasonable that if the atomic size of the atom is smaller, which means the shared electrons are closer to the nucleus, the attraction force will be greater.

But for ionic bond, the attraction is the electrostatic force between cation and anion, how is the atomic size going to affect the bond strength?

Offline BluRay

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Re: Why, if the atomic size of the ion is greater, the ionic bond is weaker?
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2009, 08:27:39 AM »
It's even simpler than in the case of covalent bond: the electrostatic energy between two charged spheres is proportional to the inverse of their distances.

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