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Topic: strongest acid?  (Read 6891 times)

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Offline hsebast1

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strongest acid?
« on: November 02, 2009, 10:19:51 PM »
SnH4 SbH3 or TeH2. i believe that  TeH2 is the strongest because it lost most of its H+ hence it disociates more than the others, am i rite

Offline csrscience.com

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Re: strongest acid?
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2009, 10:22:10 PM »
These are all hydrides - AKA strong bases.

In this case the H isn't in the H+ oxidation state, but rather the H-, and it is the oxidizer AFAIK.

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Offline Borek

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Re: strongest acid?
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2009, 02:47:45 AM »
the H-, and it is the oxidizer

Quite the opposite. It has excess of electrons and gives one happily away.
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Offline BluRay

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Re: strongest acid?
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2009, 07:48:35 AM »
One of the strongest acid is a solution of antimony pentafluoride in fluosulphuric acid: SbF5 + HSO3F.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_acid

Offline csrscience.com

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Re: strongest acid?
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2009, 12:32:10 AM »
"Quite the opposite. It has excess of electrons and gives one happily away."

So it loses electrons?

remember the saying OIL RIG?

Oxidation is lose[of electrons] Reduction is gain [of electrons].

We might be misinterpreting one another (I see I said it kind of confusingly and I'm pretty sure we are...my fault ) but the H- on a hydride is the equivalent of the O-2 on an oxide. So in order to form a hydride, Hydrogen acts like an oxidizer.


I've got this right, right?
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Offline Borek

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Re: strongest acid?
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2009, 03:15:50 AM »
No, H- is a strong reducing agent. It gives its electrons (if you give something away, you no longer have it, hence loss - and OIL - H- gets oxidized in the process) lowering oxidation state of other substance (other substance receives electrons, or gains them - RIG - gets reduced).
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Offline BluRay

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Re: strongest acid?
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2009, 03:01:23 PM »
"Quite the opposite. It has excess of electrons and gives one happily away."

So it loses electrons?

remember the saying OIL RIG?

Oxidation is lose[of electrons] Reduction is gain [of electrons].

We might be misinterpreting one another (I see I said it kind of confusingly and I'm pretty sure we are...my fault ) but the H- on a hydride is the equivalent of the O-2 on an oxide. So in order to form a hydride, Hydrogen acts like an oxidizer.


I've got this right, right?

To know if you are right or not, write the exact equation you want to discuss and specify *what kind* of hydrogen you are talking about.
Example 1: Zn + 2H+ --> Zn++ + H2
here H+ is the oxidant.

Example 2: H2 + F2 --> 2HF
here H2 is the reducing.

Example 3: 2K + H2 --> 2KH
here H2 is the oxidant.

Example 4: H- + H2O --> H2 + OH-
here H- is the reducing and water the oxidant.

...

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