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Topic: Precipitates  (Read 5235 times)

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Kneelo

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Precipitates
« on: May 05, 2004, 03:04:59 AM »
Hi
If I mix Cr2(SO4)3 + NaOH a precipitate is formed , but I'm not sure which ! Is it Cr2OH or Na(SO4)3 any sugestions would be appreciated .
Thanks Kneelo

Offline AWK

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Re:Precipitates
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2004, 05:24:22 AM »
Cr2(SO4)3 + 6NaOH = 2 Cr(OH)3(s) + 3Na2SO4
« Last Edit: May 05, 2004, 05:25:19 AM by AWK »
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Offline jdurg

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Re:Precipitates
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2004, 07:17:41 AM »
If memory serves me correctly, all alkali metal salts are soluble.  
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Offline AWK

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Re:Precipitates
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2004, 10:20:22 AM »
If memory serves me correctly, all alkali metal salts are soluble.  
 It depends on anion. KClO4, K2[PtCl6 ], K2Na[Co(NO2)6 ] are poor soluble, Na[Sb(OH)6 ], Li2CO3,
Rb2Na[Co(NO2)6 ], Cs2Na[Co(NO2)6 ] also. Poor solubility means in this case less than 1g/L, sometimes a few mg/L.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2004, 10:28:39 AM by AWK »
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Offline hmx9123

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Re:Precipitates
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2004, 11:17:54 PM »
Remember, everything is soluble, the question is how soluble.  Even things that you normally think of as incredibly soluble, like sodium chloride and sodium sulfate, can precipitate under the right conditions.  I have actually run a reaction before in which I had sodium sulfate precipitate out on me.  For a good look at inorganic solubilities, try the CRC handbook of chemistry and physics; the older editions contain inorganic compound solubility constants.  Lange's Handbook of chemistry also gives a lot of constants, but many are given as equilibrium constants.

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