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Topic: What type of radioactive element(s) does a household microwave use?  (Read 14061 times)

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Agent-X

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I've been searching for interesting ways to obtain radioactive materials.

Smoke detectors 1980s(+?)
Clocks from the 1960s
Toothpaste from the 1950s

I'm wondering what type of radioactive element(s) a microwave has. I know it gives off radiation, so it must have something inside of it..

Offline jdurg

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Re:What type of radioactive element(s) does a household microwave use?
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2005, 04:45:12 PM »
Absolutely nothing.  Microwaves are generated via a high intensity radio frequency, I believe, and there is absolutely nothing radioactive involved.
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Agent-X

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Re:What type of radioactive element(s) does a household microwave use?
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2005, 07:59:02 PM »
but yet there can be radiation leakage from a microwave?

Offline xiankai

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Re:What type of radioactive element(s) does a household microwave use?
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2005, 08:06:48 PM »
if u open the swinging door while it is on i think
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Offline Mitch

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Re:What type of radioactive element(s) does a household microwave use?
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2005, 08:19:06 PM »
but yet there can be radiation leakage from a microwave?

Heat is a type of radiation called infrared radiation but it doesn't need a radioactive material to be generated. The same is true for microwave radiation, it doesn't need to be created from radioactive materials. In fact, microwaves are not considered radiation in the sense your thinking of like gamma radiation or x-ray radiation, because microwaves do not ionize materials. Microwaves just increases the vibrations in O-H bonds, its not really of any concern. Unless you stick yourself in the microwave.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2005, 08:20:42 PM by Mitch »
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arnyk

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Re:What type of radioactive element(s) does a household microwave use?
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2005, 08:36:15 PM »
Part of the EM spectrum.

Offline constant thinker

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Re:What type of radioactive element(s) does a household microwave use?
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2005, 12:31:52 AM »
Microwaves are part of the electro magnetic spectrum. They are in the 2.4GHz range I think. They were originally devolped as radar for the British. It was later discovered though that they caused the O-H bonds to vibrate producing heat as agent-x said. There is absolutely nothing radioactive about a microwave as jdurg said.
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