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Topic: Copper Nitrate  (Read 10445 times)

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Amarnath

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Copper Nitrate
« on: July 13, 2005, 02:15:46 AM »
Hi all,

  Is it possible to recover copper from  acidified copper nitrate solution by means of electrolysis on commerical scale .

Offline xiankai

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Re:Copper Nitrate
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2005, 07:54:12 AM »
copper is less reactive than most metals, so if u use a copper cathode (to bunch up the copper together) and a graphite anode, it could be done commercially i think, as long the acidity level is not high enough to corrode anything. since copper is quite easily electrolysed into its elemental form, a moderate amount of electricity can be used.

but, im not an expert on this, if this is not a high school chemistry qn  :-\
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Amarnath

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Re:Copper Nitrate
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2005, 11:51:17 AM »
Hi ,


 Thanks for reply .What if two electrodes are graphites or copper instead of mixing them ?

Offline lemonoman

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Re:Copper Nitrate
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2005, 11:55:51 AM »
Depending on what kind of commerce you're doing, the electrolysis thing could work very well.  If you put an aluminum can in to a copper sulfate solution (or ANY solution with Cu2+ ions in it, the copper will displace the aluminum and the aluminum will go into the solution.  Perhaps you could dissolve aluminum cans in it, get the copper out (you'll know it's out because it won't be blue anymore) and then dry the solution and sell the Aluminum Nitrate? lol...theres millions of possibilities  :D

Amarnath

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Re:Copper Nitrate
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2005, 01:22:32 AM »
Hi lemonoman,

  Thanks for reply. Yes i am aware of displacement reaction works well this case . Now i am currently using Iron plate to displace copper from solution and simply drain ferrous nitrate solution as waste i dont know how to get ferrous salt from solution and a simple question is Aluminium is cheaper than iron commerically ??

  And are you sure aluminium displace copper from solution ? i like to check electrochemical series  ???
« Last Edit: July 14, 2005, 01:26:00 AM by Amarnath »

Offline xiankai

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Re:Copper Nitrate
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2005, 06:58:59 AM »
yes aluminium can displace copper easily. but as such, since its higher in the reactivity series, its extraction is very difficult as well.

the only way is by electrolysis of its ore bauxite to the molten state, normally with a melting point of 2k degrees celsius. thus a catalyst of cryolite is used instead, but then cryolite is not common, and the melting point is still reduced to only 900 degrees celsius. at such high temperatures, the graphite electrolytes eventually burn out, producing CO2 and requiring constant replacement. its actually a very costly process.

your idea of an iron plate is feasible, but it sounds more like a lab experiment than some commerical process o_O
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arnyk

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Re:Copper Nitrate
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2005, 12:12:25 PM »
Really copper is so far right on the series that any metal would displace it, like nickel.

Amarnath

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Re:Copper Nitrate
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2005, 02:26:46 AM »
yes aluminium can displace copper easily. but as such, since its higher in the reactivity series, its extraction is very difficult as well.

the only way is by electrolysis of its ore bauxite to the molten state, normally with a melting point of 2k degrees celsius. thus a catalyst of cryolite is used instead, but then cryolite is not common, and the melting point is still reduced to only 900 degrees celsius. at such high temperatures, the graphite electrolytes eventually burn out, producing CO2 and requiring constant replacement. its actually a very costly process.

your idea of an iron plate is feasible, but it sounds more like a lab experiment than some commerical process o_O


Hi ,

 Thanks for your kind reply . Is it possible to ues stainless steel as anode and copper as cathode if i like to make electrolysis of copper II nitrate to get copper from solution .

Offline xiankai

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Re:Copper Nitrate
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2005, 08:17:49 AM »
stainless steel has been made with an alloy of iron and a variety of materials. it has been designed to be corrosion-resistant(high resistance to oxidation), so im sure it could be commercially viable, since it does not need to be replaced often and will conduct electricity well.

as a side note, oxygen will be produced at the anode from electrolytic oxidation of the nitrate ion. for health safety concerns, just dont do it in a enclosed room. 100% oxygen is not healthy. :P
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Amarnath

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Re:Copper Nitrate
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2005, 09:35:20 AM »
Hi,

 Thanks all for replies and help . Can i know were i can find info about optimal current density for this electrowinning process as high current density cause electrolysis of water itself to H2 and 02 rather than copper nitrate itself which is not desirable effect so can anybody here help with current density problem and rate of electrowinning recover from solution  :)

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