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Topic: mole-to-mole conversion  (Read 7416 times)

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Tommy

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mole-to-mole conversion
« on: May 06, 2004, 05:36:01 PM »
I'm working on a lab for a online chem class. What i'm having trouble with is conversions.  The first part is #of moles of NaCHO3 in 1.21 my work shows it to be .014mol NaCHO3.  The second part is calculate # of moles of CO2 that could be produced from the # of moles of NaCHO3 using mol-to-mole.   Can you explain this to me please.

Offline Mitch

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Re:mole-to-mole conversion
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2004, 06:54:15 PM »
No matter what your doing tou always have to start by writing the chemical equation. Do you happen to know what it is for this case?
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Offline hmx9123

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Re:mole-to-mole conversion
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2004, 11:08:48 PM »
Although you do need to start by writing out a chemical equation, if you have 1 mol of sodium bicarbonate, you can only get 1 mol of CO2 from it maximum.  So, for every mol you have of sodium bicarbonate you have, you'll get 1 mol of carbon dioxide.  Unless you're doing something really funky, it should remain 1:1.

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Re:mole-to-mole conversion
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2004, 12:51:11 AM »
Are you sure its not for every 2 mols of NaHCO3 you'll get 1 mol of CO2

2 NaHCO3(s) ------->   CO2(g) + H2O(g) + Na2CO3(s)

Y. Otsubo, K. Yamaguchi, J. Chem. Soc. Japan, 82, 557-560 (1961)
« Last Edit: May 07, 2004, 02:33:14 AM by Mitch »
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Offline AWK

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Re:mole-to-mole conversion
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2004, 01:27:18 AM »
2 NaHCO3(s) ------->  CO2(g) + H2O(g) + Na2CO3(s)

Y. Otsubo, K. Yamaguchi, J. Chem. Soc. Japan, 82, 557-560 (1961)

This reaction is known alt least 200 years. In 1861 it was used in fomous Solvay process.
See: http://pubs.acs.org/subscribe/journals/tcaw/11/i02/html/02chemchron.html
AWK

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