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Topic: I'm new, where can I find this book?  (Read 20043 times)

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Offline jdurg

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2005, 04:17:21 PM »
Prussian blue:

3FeCl2 + 4FeCl3 + 18KCN -> 18KCl + Fe4[Fe(CN)6 ]3

or

3Fe2+ + 4Fe3+ + 18CN- -> Fe4[Fe(CN)6 ]3

EBAS rulez :)

I decided to implement exporting balanced equations in UBBC so you will see more reaction equations from me now ;)

Hehe.  But those aren't cyanide compounds.  A cyanide compound is a compound in which the anion is the CN- ion.  In Prussian Blue, the anion is the hexacyanoferrate ion.  The chemistry of the hexacyanoferrate ion and cyanide ions are completely different.   ;) ;D  In addition, you can give me Prussian Blue and I'll have no problem eating it.  I won't do that with NaCN, however.
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Offline Borek

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2005, 05:03:19 PM »
Hehe.  But those aren't cyanide compounds.  A cyanide compound is a compound in which the anion is the CN- ion.

That's beyond my English - for me 'compound' can be salt or complex. Compounds you are referring to - containing CN- in anionic (free) form - are salts. But perhaps in English this difference is less precise.
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Offline jdurg

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2005, 12:53:39 PM »
Yeah, it's purely semantics.  If you go up to someone and say "I just put a cyanide compound in your drink", they'll freak out.  If you go and say "I just put a hexacyanoferrate compound in your drink", they'll wonder what you're talking about.

In a sense, the difference is like that between chloride and chlorate.  Yes they both have chlorine atoms in them, but the chloride ion is completely different from the chlorate ion.
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Chrataxe

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2005, 06:04:12 PM »
Lol....kinda like nitrile.  Back in the day, the used to label it as cyanide and the railroad companies wouldn't move it.  So, they started labeling it nitrile...and of course, they had no idea what it was and had no problem hauling it.

Anyway, just curious, would Hydrogen gas in air react with oxygen?
« Last Edit: December 01, 2005, 06:04:34 PM by Chrataxe »

Offline Mitch

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2005, 06:09:32 PM »
Anyway, just curious, would Hydrogen gas in air react with oxygen?

Not without a spark. ;)
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Offline Borek

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2005, 06:17:11 PM »
Not without a spark. ;)

Or black platinum.
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Offline buckminsterfullerene

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #21 on: December 01, 2005, 06:21:18 PM »
how would black platinum work??
first time i heard of it, searched it and all i got was a book definition that it was a powder that would "accelerate a reaction without itself being affected"
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Offline Borek

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #22 on: December 01, 2005, 06:28:57 PM »
Black platinum is a very efficient catalyst. IIRC if you put some black platinum into hydrogen/oxygen mixture water starts to drip from the platinum and the metal is getting hot.
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Chrataxe

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #23 on: December 02, 2005, 02:19:13 AM »
Not without a spark. ;)

That was my initial thought.  But, it seems nothing really follows the "rules."  Like, if I where to say "If you bur a hydrocarbon in O2, you will get CO2 and water."  Which would bring the quetion, where does carbon monoxide come in?  When there is not enough O2....or take H2O2.  Why will it decompose on its own?  Why does the hydration of a alkyne give you a ketone mostly instead of an alcohol....or even  50/50 alc/ketone? Many molecules react wierd when oxygen is present.  Like: rust, hemoglobin, heck, even water.  Usually, atoms in a period have similar properties.  But, H2S is fairly covalent but H2O is about as polar as they come.  Anyway, not to insult anyone's intelligence (b/c you are all far more knowledgeable about chemistry than me), but I was just curious about the possibility of the very electronegative O2 reacting with an atom the readily gives up an electron with no flame involved...b/c, like I said, O2 does carry out many reactions on its own.

Well, that just sums up my thought process so no one thinks I'm stupid and don't understand the concept of combustion.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2005, 02:19:56 AM by Chrataxe »

Offline Mitch

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #24 on: December 02, 2005, 04:24:44 AM »
Would O2 want an other electron? Draw the MO diagram.  ;)
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Chrataxe

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #25 on: December 03, 2005, 12:16:49 AM »
Indeed...point taken.

Offline billnotgatez

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Re:I'm new, where can I find this book?
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2005, 07:15:33 AM »
<Quote from 3.3.141592653>
  I mean it has been proven that the most likely cause of the Hindenburg accident was not the hydrogen but the spark caused on the highly flammable coating outside of the vessel.
<End Quote>
There is no proof because the Incendiary Paint Theory (IPT) has been shown to be fatally flawed.
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