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Topic: "volatized" salts?  (Read 4486 times)

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Offline Frater EIE

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"volatized" salts?
« on: April 25, 2010, 03:46:39 PM »
Is it possible for a salt to become "volatized"? For instance, can, say, potassium carbonate form a complex compound with more volatile substances, so that it does not recrystallize when the solution is evaporated off, but actually comes over with the solution in a distillation?

Offline Stepan

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Re: "volatized" salts?
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2010, 01:45:11 PM »
Is it possible for a salt to become "volatized"? For instance, can, say, potassium carbonate form a complex compound with more volatile substances, so that it does not recrystallize when the solution is evaporated off, but actually comes over with the solution in a distillation?

Potassium Carbonate will "evaporate" and travel in the air as a fine mist, when droplets of water evaporate, and residual salt forms fine micro crystals suspended in air. 

At the same time, some salts do sublimate, let say Ammonia Chloride.

Offline 408

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Re: "volatized" salts?
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2010, 02:36:35 PM »

Volatility is a function of temperature.  Heat sodium chloride to 900C and you can easily smell it. 

Add hexafluoroacetone to a solution of TM salts, and the metal complex with hexafluoroacetonate will be very volatile.

Stepan: aerosols and dusts are not examples of things in a gaseous phase!

Offline Stepan

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Re: "volatized" salts?
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2010, 12:22:47 PM »

Volatility is a function of temperature.  Heat sodium chloride to 900C and you can easily smell it. 

Add hexafluoroacetone to a solution of TM salts, and the metal complex with hexafluoroacetonate will be very volatile.

Stepan: aerosols and dusts are not examples of things in a gaseous phase!

Thank you 408. In the question, the word "volatized" was put in question marks, which assumes different mechanisms. Also, your second example is not true evaporation.

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