September 30, 2022, 01:33:50 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Radiation Energies  (Read 9572 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jdurg

  • Banninator
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1366
  • Mole Snacks: +106/-23
  • Gender: Male
  • I am NOT a freak.
Radiation Energies
« on: August 03, 2005, 07:00:21 PM »
I have a quick question here.  Whenever I look at the data about radioisotopes, I always see the energy associated with the decay of said isotope.  (I.E. U-238 gives off 4.10 MeV in gamma rays, or x MeV alpha, etc. etc.).  My question is, on what scale is that energy associated with?  Is is per atom of the isotope?  Per gram?  Per mole?  NO place out there seems to indicate what the scale is.  Due to the number of decays per second, I find it hard to believe that those energies are per atom.  I just wish places would define the units they use.  It's like going to the supermarket and seeing the roast beef priced at $4.00.  Is it four bucks a pound, an ounce, a slab?
« Last Edit: August 03, 2005, 07:01:01 PM by jdurg »
"A real fart is beefy, has a density greater than or equal to the air surrounding it, consists

Offline Mitch

  • General Chemist
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5298
  • Mole Snacks: +376/-3
  • Gender: Male
  • "I bring you peace." -Mr. Burns
    • Chemistry Blog
Re:Radiation Energies
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2005, 07:21:49 PM »
It is per atom! Thus nuclear power is such an attractive energy source.
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
3. Forum Supports LaTex

Offline Grejak

  • Chemist
  • Regular Member
  • *
  • Posts: 43
  • Mole Snacks: +5/-0
  • Gender: Female
Re:Radiation Energies
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2005, 10:13:27 PM »
I have a quick question here.  Whenever I look at the data about radioisotopes, I always see the energy associated with the decay of said isotope.  (I.E. U-238 gives off 4.10 MeV in gamma rays, or x MeV alpha, etc. etc.).  My question is, on what scale is that energy associated with?  Is is per atom of the isotope?  Per gram?  Per mole?  NO place out there seems to indicate what the scale is.  Due to the number of decays per second, I find it hard to believe that those energies are per atom.  I just wish places would define the units they use.  It's like going to the supermarket and seeing the roast beef priced at $4.00.  Is it four bucks a pound, an ounce, a slab?

Mitch is correct, it is per atom.  Or, more precisely, per event.  An atom can give off numerous gamma rays during a cascade down to ground state.  Each gamma ray would then be x MeV.

Offline jdurg

  • Banninator
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1366
  • Mole Snacks: +106/-23
  • Gender: Male
  • I am NOT a freak.
Re:Radiation Energies
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2005, 11:07:30 PM »
Okay.  I just didn't realize how pathetically weak a MeV is in terms of energy.  (1 joule equals over 1 quadrillion MeV).
"A real fart is beefy, has a density greater than or equal to the air surrounding it, consists

Offline Mitch

  • General Chemist
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5298
  • Mole Snacks: +376/-3
  • Gender: Male
  • "I bring you peace." -Mr. Burns
    • Chemistry Blog
Re:Radiation Energies
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2005, 12:06:34 AM »
A quadrillion seems small, until we start talking about moles of radioactive materials.
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
3. Forum Supports LaTex

Offline jdurg

  • Banninator
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1366
  • Mole Snacks: +106/-23
  • Gender: Male
  • I am NOT a freak.
Re:Radiation Energies
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2005, 06:38:18 PM »
If you want to cringe over some completely and utter nonsense, take a look at this thread over at the scienceforums.  Good god these people just don't know anything about nuclear decay.   :(

http://www.scienceforums.net/forums/showthread.php?t=12773
"A real fart is beefy, has a density greater than or equal to the air surrounding it, consists

Offline Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Posts: 27182
  • Mole Snacks: +1765/-406
  • Gender: Male
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re:Radiation Energies
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2005, 07:24:09 PM »
It is hopeless, some people just have to die stupid.
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Offline limpet chicken

  • mad scientist
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 750
  • Mole Snacks: +49/-27
  • Gender: Male
  • Vote Limpet for supreme emperor of the new order
Re:Radiation Energies
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2005, 08:20:44 PM »
It isn't so much that people have to die stupid, but it is the stupid people who need to die ;D
The light blinds
So behold darkness as our new light
In our darkness we can see
So with others blindness
We take flight.

Sponsored Links