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Topic: Quantitative precipitation of formic acid  (Read 5011 times)

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Offline Peacock

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Quantitative precipitation of formic acid
« on: August 04, 2010, 04:37:57 AM »
Dear All,

I am struggling to find a reagent that causes the quantitative precipitation of carboxylic acids, especially formic acid.  ???

It sounds like a textbook question, but I cannot find any. Could anybody with better knowledge give me a hand in this issue?

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Offline Stepan

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Re: Quantitative precipitation of formic acid
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2010, 09:43:10 AM »
To the best of my knowledge all salts of formic and acetic acids are highly soluble

Offline discodermolide

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Re: Quantitative precipitation of formic acid
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2010, 11:45:04 AM »
Try a barium salt if you want it inorganic, otherwise use an organic amine, dicyclohexylamine for example.
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Offline Stepan

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Re: Quantitative precipitation of formic acid
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2010, 05:11:14 PM »
Barium Formate and Acetate are soluble in water (>25g/100g). 

Offline Peacock

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Re: Quantitative precipitation of formic acid
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2010, 01:53:15 PM »
Thanks for your replies.

I intend to get rid of formate (formic acid) in aqueous solution at room temperature and also at pH 7.

I thought of precipitation as the most likely means of doing it. However, given your replies, I am wondering if there are other reactions formate can undergo in the above-mentioned conditions.

Could you come up with any?

Thanks

Offline Peacock

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Re: Quantitative precipitation of formic acid
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2010, 01:59:19 PM »
I forgot to mention that there is formaldehyde as well in the solution, and CO2, therefore I am not after a redox reaction. But of any other type.

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Offline Stepan

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Re: Quantitative precipitation of formic acid
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2010, 09:07:21 AM »
Depends on composition, volume as well as application, you can neutralize the solution and distill it into another vessel.

Offline Peacock

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Re: Quantitative precipitation of formic acid
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2010, 11:19:54 AM »
Right...

Isn't there a way to transform the formate (formic acid) without oxidizing or reducing it on the spot? without further processing?

I didn't know it would be so complicated... :(


Offline Stepan

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Re: Quantitative precipitation of formic acid
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2010, 01:37:24 PM »
If you give us a better idea what you are trying to achieve (full picture), we might be able to find a solution. 8)

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