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Topic: Specific Gravity  (Read 6632 times)

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Offline AngelShare

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Specific Gravity
« on: August 18, 2005, 01:33:10 AM »
I have a tutor for this but as we went over a lot, I forgot this part of the lesson.

Alcohol has a specfic gravity of 0.78 gcm3. What volume would 83g occupy?

The only thing I can recall is him saying about conversions...g/cm3 * cm3/g or something like that...
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Offline Mitch

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Re:Specific Gravity
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2005, 01:54:26 AM »
Should say 0.78 g/cm3
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Offline AngelShare

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Re:Specific Gravity
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2005, 02:01:10 AM »
Yeah, I missed the "/", sorry. :D ;)
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Offline Mitch

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Re:Specific Gravity
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2005, 02:19:07 AM »
A proper conversion factor can be found here: http://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?page=miscellaneous#Conversion%20Factors

Whether you will be competent enough to use it, is the question. :P

Let us know if you need further help.
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Offline AngelShare

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Re:Specific Gravity
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2005, 02:36:22 AM »
Well, Miss. Incompetent is back and her face looks something like this:  ???

 :D I'm terrible with this, it's literally my weakest subject. I look at the information and I get really panicked, it's like I need Hooked on Phonics but for Chemistry. :P
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Offline DrCMS

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Re:Specific Gravity
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2005, 03:59:52 AM »
You've got all the info you need in the question.  

You don't need any conversion factors, don't confuse people Mitch.

The density or specific gravity of the alcohol is 0.78g/cm3 or 0.78g/ml

1ml  weighs 0.78g
or
1g is (1/0.78)ml  

You want to know the volume of 83g

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Specific Gravity
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2005, 04:44:49 AM »
Alcohol has a specfic gravity of 0.78 gcm3. What volume would 83g occupy?

Shouldn't specific gravity be unitless? It is after-all a ratio of 2 densities.
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Blueshawk

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Re:Specific Gravity
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2005, 01:57:46 PM »
Yes it is dimensionless   because it is relative to water .
so a specific gravity is really  0.78.  when you say  0.78 g/ml it is relative to water at 1 g/ml

so (.78 g/ml)/(1 g/ml) = 0.78

go to wikipedia.org for more info, search "specific gravity"

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