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Topic: Bonds that are both covalent and ionic  (Read 13652 times)

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Offline Limewire36

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Bonds that are both covalent and ionic
« on: September 25, 2010, 10:18:46 PM »
Which of the following compounds are both ionic and covalent bonds?

A) KNO3
B) NO2
C) ZnCL2
D) K2HPO4

(P.S. all the numbers are subscripts)

I'm pretty sure I understand how covalent bonds and ionic bonds work, but how do bonds that are BOTH ionic and covalent work?

Thanks in advance!

Offline Jorriss

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Re: Bonds that are both covalent and ionic
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2010, 03:37:10 AM »
I do not believe they mean the individual bonds are both ionic and covalent but rather, the compound contains both ionic and covalent bonds.

Offline Limewire36

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Re: Bonds that are both covalent and ionic
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2010, 12:45:05 PM »
I do not believe they mean the individual bonds are both ionic and covalent but rather, the compound contains both ionic and covalent bonds.
Err, yeah, that's what I meant.

So, does anyone know or can explain this to me?

Offline Jorriss

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Re: Bonds that are both covalent and ionic
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2010, 01:14:22 PM »
I can give an example.

KOH

It's a hydroxide (which is a hydrogen and oxide covalently bonded) ionically bonded to a potassium ion.

Offline Limewire36

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Re: Bonds that are both covalent and ionic
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2010, 04:27:47 PM »
I can give an example.

KOH

It's a hydroxide (which is a hydrogen and oxide covalently bonded) ionically bonded to a potassium ion.
Oh, okay! So, would that make A, C, and D the correct answers? Because for

A) Nitrogen (Non-metal) and 3 Oxygen (Non-metal) atoms are covalently bonded together, and then are ionicly bonded to Potassium (Metal)?

C) 2 Chlorine (Non-metal) atoms are bonded together covalently, and are ionicly bonded to Zinc (metal)?

D) Hydrogen (Non-metal), Phosphorous (Non-metal), and 4 Oxyen (Non-metal) atoms are all covalently bonded, and then are ionicly bonded to the 2 Potassium (Metal) atoms?

Is this done correctly?

Offline Jorriss

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Re: Bonds that are both covalent and ionic
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2010, 06:10:33 PM »
Close, except for C. ZnCl2 does not qualify. It's two separate chloride ions ionically bonded to a Zinc ion.

Offline Limewire36

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Re: Bonds that are both covalent and ionic
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2010, 07:01:36 PM »
Close, except for C. ZnCl2 does not qualify. It's two separate chloride ions ionically bonded to a Zinc ion.
What do you mean by that? Can't a chlorine atom combine with another chlorine atom to form a covalent bond, and then both of those ionicly bond with the zinc atom? Sorry if this is a dumb question! By the way, your help is definitely appreciated! =)

Offline ooosh

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Re: Bonds that are both covalent and ionic
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2010, 11:18:02 PM »

[/quote]What do you mean by that? Can't a chlorine atom combine with another chlorine atom to form a covalent bond, and then both of those ionicly bond with the zinc atom? Sorry if this is a dumb question! By the way, your help is definitely appreciated! =)
[/quote]


ZnCl2 is not a correct answer,because the two chlorine atoms in ZnCl2 only ionically bond to Znic ion,not combine with each other. You know,the chlorine already has 7 electrons,so it can noly bond to one other atom,if a chlorine atom combine with another chlorine atom will generate chlorine gas.Do you understand me ?

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