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Topic: SN2 in a polar, protic solvent...why?  (Read 6224 times)

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Offline cabaal

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SN2 in a polar, protic solvent...why?
« on: November 12, 2010, 06:41:58 PM »


It tells me it should be an SN2 reaction. Why? I thought SN2 reactions had to be carried out in a polar, aprotic solvent or else the solvent would severely retard the reaction by forming a solvent shell around the nucleophile.

edit: Or am I misreading that? "In the presence of NaOH" means NaOH acts as the solvent, correct?

Offline cabaal

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Re: SN2 in a polar, protic solvent...why?
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2010, 07:21:55 PM »
Nevermind, I figured it out. CH3-SH reacts with NaOH to form CH3SNa+ and H2O. CH3SNa+ is then substituted on the cycloalkane.

Offline MissPhosgene

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Re: SN2 in a polar, protic solvent...why?
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2010, 12:13:31 AM »
It means water is the solvent.
Stereograms of the 32 crystallographic point groups: little bike wheels of cold, hard, pure rationality.

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