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Topic: SYNTHESIS OF Fe3O4  (Read 5636 times)

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Offline cdmaverick

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SYNTHESIS OF Fe3O4
« on: November 17, 2010, 08:33:51 PM »
Could Fe3O4 be synthesised from iron powder?What's the conditions?Is the Fe3O4 cystalline or amorphous?

Offline The Jar

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Re: SYNTHESIS OF Fe3O4
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2011, 01:54:03 PM »
I'm not sure off the top of my head.  Fe2O3 is more stable in oxidizing conditions.  An Ellingham diagram can give you this information.  Do you know how to use one?

Offline Enthalpy

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Re: SYNTHESIS OF Fe3O4
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2011, 01:59:56 PM »
Rust.

And iron ore from Sweden, which might be cheaper than producing your oxide.

Offline The Jar

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Re: SYNTHESIS OF Fe3O4
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2011, 03:39:35 PM »
If you need pure, crystalline, Fe3O4 don't use 'rust', which is a combination of many iron oxides, hydroxides, and carbonates.

Offline Enthalpy

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Re: SYNTHESIS OF Fe3O4
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2011, 09:28:53 AM »
Absolutely right!

That was just a recollection of a child's experiment where iron powder in a test tube turned over water produced a magnetized oxide. Carbonates won't have been abundant in this case, but hydroxides certainly.

What stays is that Fe3O4 appears naturally under the right conditions.

Ways from iron and from hydroxide to magnetite:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fe3O4

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