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Topic: Hybrid orbitals  (Read 3592 times)

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Offline dipesh747

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Hybrid orbitals
« on: March 17, 2012, 04:15:26 PM »
So I'm sure people are aware of elements such as S and P can form 6 and 5 bonds respectively.
But why does Chlorine not use SPD hybrid orbitals to form theoretically 7 bonds.

Offline Schrödinger

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Re: Hybrid orbitals
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2012, 02:21:17 PM »
Well, it does form 7 bonds in the ion ClO4- doesnt it?
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Offline dipesh747

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Re: Hybrid orbitals
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2012, 06:16:53 PM »
Don't think I've ever come across that one before!! 

Offline Schrödinger

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Re: Hybrid orbitals
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2012, 12:12:00 PM »
HClO4 - it's called perchloric acid. As a matter of fact, Cl, Br and I all form such acids with +7 oxidation state... perchloric/perbromic/periodic acid
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Offline Borek

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Re: Hybrid orbitals
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2012, 12:46:58 PM »
For periodic acid it is more complicated, as it exists in more than one form (google orthoperiodic acid). Perbromic is rather unstable.
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Offline cheese (MSW)

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Re: Hybrid orbitals
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2012, 12:49:47 PM »
Although extremely reactive, ClF5 is a well-characterized cmpd.
Cl (and Br) however do not form an analogue of IF7 (pentagonal
bipyramid).
The reason for this is either steric or electronic.  Consider each in turn
and come up with both a steric an electronic reason for the instability of
ClF7.  In particular, how do the np-nd energy gaps behave as one goes from
Cl right arrow Br right arrow I?
(Hybridization is now thought to be an artifact and the term should be avoided.)

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