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Topic: Does heating water to say 50 degrees celcius make it more acidic or more basic?  (Read 9458 times)

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Offline jubba

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Does heating water to say 50 degrees celciuc make it more acidic or more basic?

I think its neutral as equal amount of hydronium and hydroxide ions will be created.
Can anyone verify or reject this?  :robots:
« Last Edit: September 16, 2005, 09:10:00 PM by Mitch »

Offline jubba

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Re:Acid Bases round 2 (i had an hideous exam)
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2005, 02:37:35 AM »
anybody :1eye:

Offline Borek

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Re:Acid Bases round 2 (i had an hideous exam)
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2005, 03:22:04 AM »
Does heating water to say 50 degrees celciuc make it more acidic or more basic?

Depends on how do you define neutral. If H+ = OH- then you are right. If pH=7.00 then you are wrong - Kw value is slightly higher in higher temperatures.
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Offline jubba

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Re:Acid Bases round 2 (i had an hideous exam)
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2005, 11:54:30 PM »
the definition was H+=OH-

Offline Borek

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Re:Acid Bases round 2 (i had an hideous exam)
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2005, 03:29:37 AM »
the definition was H+=OH-

So all you have to take into account is the stoichiometry of the water dissociation reaction. Can it produce different amounts of H+ and OH-?
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Offline Mitch

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Re:Acid Bases round 2 (i had an hideous exam)
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2005, 09:09:42 PM »
Kw is a function of temperature, that is my hint.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Kw is no longer 10-14 at 50C. It will be a much bigger value because there is greater extent of dissociation. However, the aqueous system still remains neutral because [H+] = [OH-]
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charco

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Acidity is defined by the concentration of [H+] therefore it becomes more acidic. pH is the accepted measure of acidity and not a balance between H+ and OH- ions. At higher temperatures the water dissociation equilibrium moves in the direction of endothermic change further to the RHS i.e. side of the ions. Kw becomes larger and the solution has a lower pH.

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