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Topic: behaviour of sulphuric acid H2SO4  (Read 2116 times)

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Offline kenny1999

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behaviour of sulphuric acid H2SO4
« on: March 23, 2011, 05:20:42 PM »
i would like to know why sometimes sulphuric acid would react with KOH to give potassium sulphate (acid:alkali = 1:2 mole in reaction) but sometimes it would react with KOH to give potassium hydrogensulphate (so acid:alkali = 1:1).

I would like to know why the hydrogensulphate would not further ionize to give more Hydrogren, under what conditions would this occur?

Thank you guys!

Offline Borek

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Re: behaviour of sulphuric acid H2SO4
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2011, 06:27:29 PM »
It is all in stoichiometry, reaction always goes to the end. If you mix acid and base 1:1 you will get hydrogen sulfate, if you add 1.5:1, you will get mixture of both salts, if you will mix them 2:1, you will get just sulfate.
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Offline DevaDevil

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Re: behaviour of sulphuric acid H2SO4
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2011, 02:01:43 PM »
It is all in stoichiometry, reaction always goes to the end.

indeed, if you mix KOH and H2SO4 in a 1:1 ratio, you will have KOH as limiting reagent, meaning it will be used up before you can neutralize all of the acid.

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