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Topic: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz  (Read 8303 times)

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Offline Erin

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Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« on: March 20, 2011, 02:27:29 PM »
Lab Procedure:
1 mole of CuSO4 was weighed out. Then dissolved in a beaker of water over a flame. After allowing to cool completely, .04mol of Fe was added to the solution then filtered out. The resulting substance was left to completely dry and the weight of the resulting Cu was found.

Questions:
-Illustrate how the coefficients in a balanced chem equation can be used to predict the mass of the products of a chemical reaction from a known mass of one of the reactants.
-Why is the Fe considered a limiting factor in the experiment?
-If the amount of Fe used was increased, what effect would this have on the amount of copper metal produced?
-If you increased the amount of CuSO4 what effect would this have on the amount of Cu metal produced?
-Why is Copper Sulfate used in excess in this experiment?
-HOW can the mass of a product be predicted?
-On what is the "Big idea" based on?
-Situations were chemist make predictions?
-What are the main points of the lab and what was found?

THANKS <3

Offline Erin

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2011, 03:16:37 PM »
HEELLLPPP!!!!

Offline rabolisk

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2011, 04:19:44 PM »
Erin, these are pretty simple stoichiometric concepts. We can only help you after you've given some effort.

Offline Erin

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2011, 04:31:21 PM »
I somewhat get the concept of how the elements take the place of others to create a balanced equation. But I don't get the part of "prediction". How is this procedure a example of it? I just don't know were to start....:(

Offline Borek

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2011, 05:58:54 PM »
Prediction as in "use reaction stoichiometry to calculate amount of product knowing amount of reactant".
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Offline Erin

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2011, 07:21:17 PM »
Can someone please answer these questions for me? ;D

-Illustrate how the coefficients in a balanced chem equation can be used to predict the mass of the products of a chemical reaction from a known mass of one of the reactants.
-Why is the Fe considered a limiting factor in the experiment?
-If the amount of Fe used was increased, what effect would this have on the amount of copper metal produced?
-If you increased the amount of CuSO4 what effect would this have on the amount of Cu metal produced?
-Why is Copper Sulfate used in excess in this experiment?
-HOW can the mass of a product be predicted?
-On what is the "Big idea" based on?
-Situations were chemist make predictions?
-What are the main points of the lab and what was found?

PLEASE.. Thanks <3  ;D

Offline rabolisk

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2011, 08:07:08 PM »
No one here will simply answer it for you. But I'll help you get started in the right direction. Write the chemical reaction that is occurring in this lab and balance it first.

Offline Maverick

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2011, 08:13:35 PM »
i had the same problem, i can see where your coming from first start out by writing out the balanced equation
start out from there

Offline Erin

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2011, 09:48:53 PM »
Whats the equation?

Offline rabolisk

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2011, 10:02:19 PM »
Whats the equation?

I asked you. You have to help yourself if you want to be helped.

Offline Maverick

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2011, 10:08:33 PM »
Lab Procedure:
1 mole of CuSO4 was weighed out. Then dissolved in a beaker of water over a flame. After allowing to cool completely, .04mol of Fe was added to the solution then filtered out. The resulting substance was left to completely dry and the weight of the resulting Cu was found.

Questions:
-Illustrate how the coefficients in a balanced chem equation can be used to predict the mass of the products of a chemical reaction from a known mass of one of the reactants.
-Why is the Fe considered a limiting factor in the experiment?
-If the amount of Fe used was increased, what effect would this have on the amount of copper metal produced?
-If you increased the amount of CuSO4 what effect would this have on the amount of Cu metal produced?
-Why is Copper Sulfate used in excess in this experiment?
-HOW can the mass of a product be predicted?
-On what is the "Big idea" based on?
-Situations were chemist make predictions?
-What are the main points of the lab and what was found?

THANKS <3
CuSO4 + Fe  :rarrow: FeSO4 + Cu
thats the equation i believe now just balance it

Offline Erin

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2011, 10:11:55 PM »
CuSO4 + 4Fe  :rarrow: FeSO4 + 4Cu

Is that correct? And what does this prove? Thanks again

Offline Maverick

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2011, 10:38:18 PM »
well it was balanced the way it was my mistake:-[  so balanced = CuSO4 + Fe   --->FeSO4 + Cu

but any ways
1. convert any given to moles
2. A,B,X,Y
 A would be the element your given
B would be the element u want find the amount of
X is the coefficent of the given element
Y is the coefficent for the element u want to find out

so A= Fe
B = FeSO4
X=1 (coefficent in front of Fe since there isnt one we just use as in 1 of the molecule Fe)
Y=1(refer to explantion for Fe)

the equation would look like
moles of given x (Y/X)
im not the best at explaining hope this clears it up a bit

Offline AWK

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2011, 04:12:17 AM »
You have 1 mole of CuSO4 and 0.04 mole of Fe. How many moles of Cu you can obtain? And finally convert moles to grams to compare with your experiment.
This is a very simple limiting reagent problem. Look at any textbook on General Chemistry or Wikipedia or internet (hundreds good places, I recommend Borek -our moderator page as staring point - http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=balancing-stoichiometry&right=limiting-reagents)
AWK

Offline Erin

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Re: Can the mass of a product be predicted?- Lab help plz
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2011, 06:23:41 AM »
thanks!! any further useful info? ;)

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