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Topic: Unknown glassware item  (Read 8566 times)

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Offline cristiro

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Unknown glassware item
« on: October 02, 2005, 09:39:28 AM »
I've got an unknown lassware item and I don't know whai is good for . i have the picture of it. Anyone can help me with this?

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Re:Unknown glassware item
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2005, 01:29:21 PM »
I can't make out the detail around where your finger tips are.  What is the interface between the three glass parts that seem to come together there?  Also, which of the tubes on the left in your picture are open?  The one on the right is sealed, right?

Are there any moving parts?  It does look a little like a gas bubbler, but it might be missing a piece.

Offline cristiro

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Re:Unknown glassware item
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2005, 03:28:04 PM »
Description : This is one piece with an opening (beak) on the left side which comunicates with an internal test tube which has the bottom on the extreme right side. In the middle , that test tube has an opening upward which comunicates with the larger room. The top of the left side is an small opening (beak) which comunicates with the larger room. The tube on the middle, downward comunicates with the larger room, the same.

Offline Mitch

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Re:Unknown glassware item
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2005, 03:33:20 PM »
Can you take a better picture?
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Offline cristiro

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Re:Unknown glassware item
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2005, 03:48:21 PM »
looks like this

Offline Mitch

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Re:Unknown glassware item
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2005, 03:51:15 PM »
Seems like a very exotic cold-finger glassware.
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Offline cristiro

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Re:Unknown glassware item
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2005, 04:08:29 PM »
I guess is a gas bubbler or can be even a vaccum adapter. What do you think?

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Re:Unknown glassware item
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2005, 04:18:04 PM »
It seems a little much for a vacuum adapter, doesn't it?  And the inlets are all in the wrong relative places to be a gas bubbler.

I can't really figure it out either.

What about some kind of continuous distillation collection piece?  If the left side inlet were connected to a condenser from a short path distillation head then the distillate would collect in the tube on the far right until it filled enough to drain out the tube on the bottom.  The inlet on the top could be an gas inlet so that you could keep everything under nitrogen or vacuum.

Similarly, it might be a continuous extractor.  If you had a dense, immiscible solvent in the tube on the right and had it set so that the tube on the right was pointing down in the reaction set up, then you could distill out some material from your reaction through the inlet on the left of the picture.  As the distillate collected in the tube, the lighter organic phase would float to the top until enough collected to drain back through the tube in the bottom of the picture and back into the initial reaction.  Any materials in soluble in the dense solvent would be extracted into the dense solvent right after they distilled over.  This would allow you to use a very small amount of the dense solvent and essentially you would never stop extracting the distillate.  The inlet on the top of the picture could again be used for nitrogen inlet.

I've never seen a continuous extractor that looked like this though.  They usually look like this.

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