October 20, 2019, 06:12:59 PM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours  (Read 14084 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Mitch

  • General Chemist
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5290
  • Mole Snacks: +376/-2
  • Gender: Male
  • "I bring you peace." -Mr. Burns
    • Chemistry Blog
Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« on: May 26, 2004, 05:35:11 PM »
One interesting example of taking the conjugation aspect of color to its limits is polyacetylene. Where you have a polymer with (-C=C-)n. The color of such a highly conjugated material is metallic metal! A very odd plastic indeed, I have been fortunate enough to see this polymer.
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
3. Forum Supports LaTex

Offline Donaldson Tan

  • Editor, New Asia Republic
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3178
  • Mole Snacks: +261/-12
  • Gender: Male
    • New Asia Republic
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2004, 12:09:01 AM »
wow.. does it exhibit metallic properties?
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Offline Mitch

  • General Chemist
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5290
  • Mole Snacks: +376/-2
  • Gender: Male
  • "I bring you peace." -Mr. Burns
    • Chemistry Blog
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2004, 02:09:26 PM »
Yup, the organic chemist won the nobel prize for it, it was relatively recent.
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
3. Forum Supports LaTex

Offline Mitch

  • General Chemist
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5290
  • Mole Snacks: +376/-2
  • Gender: Male
  • "I bring you peace." -Mr. Burns
    • Chemistry Blog
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
3. Forum Supports LaTex

Corvettaholic

  • Guest
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2004, 03:37:34 PM »
Just got finished reading it, neat stuff. So it pretty much boils down a new plastic that can conduct electricity, right? One thing I was fuzzy on, does it ALWAYS conduct, or do you gotta do something special first? So lets say I get my hands on this new polymer, and hook up a battery and lightbulb to it. Will it work as a wire just like a copper wire would?

Offline Mitch

  • General Chemist
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5290
  • Mole Snacks: +376/-2
  • Gender: Male
  • "I bring you peace." -Mr. Burns
    • Chemistry Blog
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2004, 09:18:21 PM »
Yes it would.
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
3. Forum Supports LaTex

Offline AWK

  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 6658
  • Mole Snacks: +480/-80
  • Gender: Male
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2004, 05:23:42 AM »
Will it work as a wire just like a copper wire would?
Yes it would.
But it's better to use even gold wire - it's cheaper (as yet?).
« Last Edit: May 28, 2004, 05:24:21 AM by AWK »
AWK

Offline Donaldson Tan

  • Editor, New Asia Republic
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3178
  • Mole Snacks: +261/-12
  • Gender: Male
    • New Asia Republic
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2004, 09:18:03 AM »
Polyacetylene is a semi conductor in its original form. U may either p-dope it (oxidise using halogen) or n-dope it (reduce it with an alkali metal) to produce the conductor form. I'm so impressed by its chemical properties. Moreover, once doped, its conductivity is comparable to Cu.  Can an organic polymer like this replace Germanium inside our CPU? Tjos would be amazing, if it's possible to synthesise raw material for making chips. I'm sure u all know how Si waffles are being made so slowly.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Corvettaholic

  • Guest
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2004, 11:37:12 AM »
I'm really liking this conducting polymer idea for magnetic reasons. Am I wrong in thinking polymer = plastic? This stuff would be perfect for another one of my invention ideas that I'll probably never get enough money to build.

Anyone know how magnetic gold is?

Offline Mitch

  • General Chemist
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5290
  • Mole Snacks: +376/-2
  • Gender: Male
  • "I bring you peace." -Mr. Burns
    • Chemistry Blog
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2004, 01:09:10 PM »
Anything that conducts electricity will generate a magnetic field. It's strength is dependent on the magnitude of the current flowing.

Polymer = plastic. It would feel just like what you would expect a plastic to feel like.
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
3. Forum Supports LaTex

Corvettaholic

  • Guest
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2004, 01:21:09 PM »
Oh I know anything electricity flows though, a magnetic field follows. What I meant by magnetic, is that the polymer "wire" isn't metal, and less likely to be affected by an external field (as in yank it around) when its just chillin doing nothing. At least it seems like good logic to me.

Offline gregpawin

  • Cradle Bandit
  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 245
  • Mole Snacks: +22/-5
  • Gender: Male
  • Ebichu chu chu chuses you!
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2004, 09:22:04 PM »
I severely doubt these being used for anything as complex as a processor.  Heat outputs from a chip would easily melt the polymer.  Also, current methods to produce fine structure in wafers wouldn't work on something with such a low melting point.  What they're moving towards is something with a high thermal conductivity... ie. diamond.  Perhaps one day they can make some pretty cool flexible lights.
I've got nothin'

Offline Mitch

  • General Chemist
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5290
  • Mole Snacks: +376/-2
  • Gender: Male
  • "I bring you peace." -Mr. Burns
    • Chemistry Blog
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2004, 04:25:32 PM »
The polymer is actually air sensitive too, and I doubt any industry wants to go back to vacuum tube technology.
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
3. Forum Supports LaTex

Offline Donaldson Tan

  • Editor, New Asia Republic
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3178
  • Mole Snacks: +261/-12
  • Gender: Male
    • New Asia Republic
Re:Colours in Organic Chemistry: Predicting Colours
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2004, 04:45:10 PM »
The polymer is actually air sensitive too, and I doubt any industry wants to go back to vacuum tube technology.

 :blahblah1:

Imagine a liquid processor (not the usual solid). I can think of a use already, that it can flow thru capillary networks and receive information feedback on-the-move, whereby the network tunnels through a building.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Sponsored Links