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Topic: Bronze alloy question  (Read 5627 times)

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Cindyy

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Bronze alloy question
« on: May 26, 2004, 09:40:08 PM »
I need help.  I know that copper and tin make bronze.  But if you have acidic water mixed in with the copper and then tried to mix in tin what would happen.  Would tin replace the water?  Do you need something hot to melt the copper and tin together?
« Last Edit: May 26, 2004, 09:51:19 PM by hmx9123 »

Offline hmx9123

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Re:Bronze alloy question
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2004, 09:54:12 PM »
Bronze is formed as an alloy, which is one metal dissolved in another so to speak.  It requires molten metals, not just solutions of the two mixed together.  I'm sure some of the other posters here may be able to enlighten you more.  A good materials science book will provide you with a lot more information about alloys.

Cindyy

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Re:Bronze alloy question
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2004, 11:18:09 PM »
I misread the question... the question actually is if you have an acidic stream with copper ions would placing tin cans in the stream replace the tin with copper?  I thought maybe it would make bronze because tin and copper make bronze.  Thanks for any help.  Sorry about the mistake

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Bronze alloy question
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2004, 12:23:09 AM »
LOL. That's a very big a deviation from the original question.

Your reaction mixture should contain hydrogen ions (in virtue of being an acid), copper(II) ions and the metal tin. With reference to the electrochemical series, we know that the hydrogens ions are more reactive than copper(II) ions. Hence, the hydrogen ions will react with tin, not the copper(II) ions. Effectively, this is just a chemical reaction between acid and metal.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Cindyy

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Re:Bronze alloy question
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2004, 12:41:32 AM »
thanks alot.  and sorry for the mix-up.

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