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Topic: Gas Law! i need your help :(  (Read 5111 times)

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Offline stifmeister111

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Gas Law! i need your help :(
« on: December 13, 2011, 09:44:25 AM »
A cylinder Containing 44.0L of Helium gas at a pressure of 170 atm is to be used to fill toy balloons to a pressure of 170atm. Each inflated balloon has a volume of 2.0L. what is the maximum number of balloons that can be inflated??

Offline Borek

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Re: Gas Law! i need your help :(
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2011, 09:59:24 AM »
You have to show your attempts at solving the question to receive help. This is a forum policy.

Are you sure toy balloons are to be filled to 170 atm? If so, it is just 44.0/2.0 = 22 balloons.

Which is already kind of a hint, even if I doubt you copied the question correctly.
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Offline stifmeister111

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Re: Gas Law! i need your help :(
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2011, 10:13:19 AM »
You have to show your attempts at solving the question to receive help. This is a forum policy.

Are you sure toy balloons are to be filled to 170 atm? If so, it is just 44.0/2.0 = 22 balloons.

Which is already kind of a hint, even if I doubt you copied the question correctly.

Good Day Admin Borek, I'm so Sorry for what I did. I tried to solve the problem by using Boyle's Law. But i was baffled by the fact that i will use 1.1 atm as my p2. am i correct with this hypothesis? thank you very much!

Offline sjb

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Re: Gas Law! i need your help :(
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2011, 11:18:30 AM »
You have to show your attempts at solving the question to receive help. This is a forum policy.

Are you sure toy balloons are to be filled to 170 atm? If so, it is just 44.0/2.0 = 22 balloons.

Which is already kind of a hint, even if I doubt you copied the question correctly.

Good Day Admin Borek, I'm so Sorry for what I did. I tried to solve the problem by using Boyle's Law. But i was baffled by the fact that i will use 1.1 atm as my p2. am i correct with this hypothesis? thank you very much!

OK, so what is the new volume of helium then, if the pressure has changed from 170 atm to 1.1 atm?

Offline stifmeister111

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Re: Gas Law! i need your help :(
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2011, 11:34:44 AM »
You have to show your attempts at solving the question to receive help. This is a forum policy.

Are you sure toy balloons are to be filled to 170 atm? If so, it is just 44.0/2.0 = 22 balloons.

Which is already kind of a hint, even if I doubt you copied the question correctly.

Good Day Admin Borek, I'm so Sorry for what I did. I tried to solve the problem by using Boyle's Law. But i was baffled by the fact that i will use 1.1 atm as my p2. am i correct with this hypothesis? thank you very much!

OK, so what is the new volume of helium then, if the pressure has changed from 170 atm to 1.1 atm?

Good Day Sir, based on Boyle's Law it's 6800L (which is I believe is waaaay to big!) so the balloons to be inflated will be 6800/2 = 3400 balloons? Sir is this possible?

Offline Borek

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Re: Gas Law! i need your help :(
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2011, 02:16:40 PM »
That's more or less correct approach and a reasonable number - I just don't get why you selected 1.1 atm?
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