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Topic: Apo form  (Read 31529 times)

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Offline qw098

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Apo form
« on: December 17, 2011, 01:41:25 PM »
Hi guys, I was reading in my notes about freedocking and it says:

Free docking: ligand is docked into a protein structure for which only the apo form is known.

I tried googling to see what "apo form" is/means but I couldn't come across anything. It seems to be a term that is used quite a bit but I'm not sure what it is. If someone could let me know what it means that would be great!

Thanks!

Offline Dan

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Re: Apo form
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2011, 05:40:05 PM »
If you have an enzyme that requires a cofactor to show activity, the [enzyme+cofactor] is a holoenzyme, and the inactive enzyme (lacking the cofactor) is an apoenzyme.

My biochemistry was never good, and is very rusty. I am almost completely ignorant of modelling, so I probably can't say any more.
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Offline qw098

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Re: Apo form
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2011, 07:10:15 PM »
Thank you again sir!

Clear as crystal :)

Offline fledarmus

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Re: Apo form
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2011, 12:04:01 PM »
Same thing for modeling. A crystal structure or molecular model of the apo form is just a structure of the enzyme with no ligand bound.

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