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Topic: Microwave irradiation  (Read 7646 times)

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Offline WiXoo

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Microwave irradiation
« on: March 20, 2012, 01:45:35 AM »
Hello everybody,

I have a question. Currently I'm working with pressured microwave reactor. And recently, I'm observing some strange things related to this topic. My question is simple. Is it possible, that pressure inside the microwave reactor, will affect microwave absorption of heated liquid? Is there any chance of doing that? Thank you very much... :P

Offline fledarmus

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Re: Microwave irradiation
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2012, 08:04:58 AM »
Pressure of what? Increasing the pressure of a gas in your reaction also increasing the mass of that gas and the total amount of material you are trying to heat. At constant energy input, it will take longer to raise the temperature of a larger mass of material than of a smaller mass. Is this what you are asking?

Offline WiXoo

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Re: Microwave irradiation
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2012, 11:09:00 AM »
Ok another way. Maybe I was asking wrong way. I'm using nitrogen as inert gas. In that case I'm heating Monopropylen glycol (MPG). Because, when I'm heating it, with no pressure (atmopspehric pressure), I'm will get only 120°C. Then the heating curve will stop at this temperature 120°C But when I'll add some more pressure, let's say 400kPa I can get to 160°C and than it will stop again at this temperature. So is it possible, that this amount of pressure will increase the absorption of MW irradiation into MPG?

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