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Topic: Why does the ionization of ammonia occur in aqueous solution?  (Read 1884 times)

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Offline ayyaddict

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Ionization of Ammonia: NH3 (aq) + H2O (l) --> NH4+(aq) + OH-(aq)

I have calcuated the Delta Grxn to be positive (+27.02 kj/mol) and the question asks why the ionization of ammonia actually occurs in aqueous solution despite the reaction being non-spontaneous? Is there a way for this reaction to actually occur?

Offline Dan

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Re: Why does the ionization of ammonia occur in aqueous solution?
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2012, 05:37:19 AM »
It's a dynamic equilibrium, a positive :delta: G just means the equilibrium lies on the left side.

NH3 (aq) + H2O (l) ::equil:: NH4+ (aq) + OH-(aq)
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Offline ayyaddict

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Re: Why does the ionization of ammonia occur in aqueous solution?
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2012, 12:22:38 PM »
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks very much Dan.

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