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Topic: Why do inert gases liquified an solidied at low temp?  (Read 4056 times)

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Offline lamborg

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Why do inert gases liquified an solidied at low temp?
« on: May 31, 2012, 04:24:35 PM »
I was going through questions, and I saw this one.

Why do inert gases liquified an solidied at low temp? Explain.

There seem to be some minor error in the question, can you please correct it and explain the reason?

Offline ramboacid

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Re: Why do inert gases liquified an solidied at low temp?
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2012, 05:48:48 PM »
Wouldn't noble gases liquefy for the same reasons normal gases liquefy? There isn't a chemical reaction going on, just a phase change.

As the gas cools, gas molecules begin to slow down as their kinetic energy is lowered. Intermolecular forces can then cause molecules to be attracted to each other and clump together in a liquid phase. With noble gases, London forces would cause molecules to aggregrate and slow down whereas there is a possibility that other stronger intermolecular forces could cause other gases to liquefy.

I don't see an error in the logic of the question; there are some grammar issues. Maybe I'm missing something though.
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Offline Arkcon

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Re: Why do inert gases liquified an solidied at low temp?
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2012, 06:06:14 PM »
Well, there is a way you can think of a good question around these points.  Something like, Ideal gasses can't be liquified, but other gasses can.  Why is that?  You'd frame the answer with examples of how real gasses are not ideal gasses.  Or maybe you could ask, ideal gasses can't be liquefied, noble gasses can only be liquefied at very low temperatures and very high pressures, other gasses are liquefied at more moderate conditions.  How are these differences explained?
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

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