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Offline dnbwise

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calculating sample weight
« on: December 01, 2005, 08:36:38 PM »
I did a spectrometry experiment measuring the absorption of K+ samples of gatorade. I added 4ml of gatorade per sample to a 100 ml volumetric flask, and filled to the mark with DI water. Once I got the absorption I am supposed to figure out how much K per serving but I need to know the sample weight so I can calculate the K per serving. How can I figure out the sample weight, it should be around 4 ml, since that is what I added with a pipet, but I need to know the exact amount?

Offline mike

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2005, 09:02:55 PM »
Why can't you just weigh the sample?
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Offline dnbwise

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2005, 09:18:21 PM »
I can't weight the sample because the experiment has already taken place for one.

Offline mike

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2005, 09:31:23 PM »
You could still figure out K per serving but using volume instead of mass maybe.
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Offline dnbwise

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2005, 11:14:16 PM »
how would I go about doing so?

Offline mike

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2005, 11:20:31 PM »
According to your results, how much K was there in the sample that you measured?
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Offline dnbwise

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2005, 11:36:24 PM »
I have the absorbance for the samples

sample 1: A = 0.364
sample 2: A = 0.427

from these values I can use the equation from my calibration curve (A = .0452*[K] + .086) to determine the [K] in ppm for the samples.

Offline mike

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2005, 11:51:37 PM »
Great, so you know the concentration in your diluted sample (remember 4mL in 100mL) so you just need to calculate the concentration in the original undiluted 4mL of gatorade.
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Offline dnbwise

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2005, 01:12:30 AM »
wouldn't that just give me the K weight in the sample? The only way I know how to determine the K/serving is:

X/g serving = g of K/ g of sample => X = g of K/serving

Since, I don't know the sample weight I have two unknowns (X and g of sample). The only thing I can figure is I could say density of gatorade ~1g/L and since I used a pipet which is an accurate instrument I could figure the original sample weight by

4*10^-3 L gatorade (1 g/ L) = 4*10^-3 g gatorade
« Last Edit: December 02, 2005, 01:19:51 AM by dnbwise »

Offline mike

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2005, 01:19:21 AM »
If I have read your data correctly, sample A showed an absorbance of 0.364.

And according to your equation:

A = .0452*[K] + .086

therefore:

[K] = (A-0.086)/0.0452

to give you [K] in ppm

now ppm = mg/L

so you can calculate the [K] in mg/L for the cilute sample, you diluted 4mL to 100mL so it is really 25 times more concentrated than this. So you can calculate the [K] in the original sample of 4mL and then depending on what your sample size is (for example 300mL) you can say how much K is in the sample.
There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.

Offline dnbwise

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2005, 01:38:13 AM »
Ok so here is what I calculate for sample 1:

[K] = .364 - .086/.0452 = 6.15 ppm

4ml (6.15 ug/ml) = .0256 mg K

1 serving of gatorade = 240 ml

How can I find the K mg/serving of this sample without the total sample weight (not just the K weight in the sample)?

Offline dnbwise

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2005, 10:00:31 PM »
Alright, I have to figure this out by sunday, so I can write my lab report (I have way too much preparing to do for my finals this weekend than to worry about this final lab report for a 1 credit hour class). Maybe there is some easier way to calculate the K/serving with the data that I have by just using it in mL, but I only know how to do it using grams. So, basically if someone knows how to figure it out I would greatly appreciate it if they could show an example calculation. Otherwise, what do you guys think the density of gatorade is? I figure it to be the same as water, since that is what most of it is. Or maybe one of you guys could actually test this if you have a scale and a pipet.

Offline mike

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2005, 07:37:19 PM »
I don't see the problem, you know the concentration of K in mg/L, you know how many litres is equal to one serve ??? ???
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Offline dnbwise

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Re:calculating sample weight
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2005, 02:24:38 AM »
all good man, I figured it out the other day, but thanks.

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