December 03, 2020, 05:32:35 AM
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Topic: What is the difference between Nuclear Chemistry and Physical Chemistry?  (Read 4341 times)

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Offline Bublik

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Can someone please outline the differences between the two disciplines? To me they seem to be the same thing.
What are the job/career prospects of both? Please feel free to share any personal and relevant information or experience which emphasizes the differences.

Thanks in advance.

Offline Schrödinger

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Nuclear chemistry is one niche in chemistry that deals with radioactive nuclei, and the like. Physical chemistry is not even by a long shot, a niche! It deals with physical phenomena in the chemical world, to put it in brief.
"Destiny is not a matter of chance; but a matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for; it is a thing to be achieved."
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Offline Bublik

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Thanks for the reply. I wouldn't have expected nuclear chemistry to be a niche, but is it safe to say that nuclear chemistry is a specific part of physical chemistry, in which one can specialize?

Offline Schrödinger

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Its not really hardcore physical chemistry. Although treated as physical chemistry a few decades back, now it is also found in some inorganic texts. Basically, it has evolved as another branch altogether - like biochemistry. Initially bio molecules came under organic chemistry, and even now you can find them in organic texts. But its a whole new branch now
"Destiny is not a matter of chance; but a matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for; it is a thing to be achieved."
- William Jennings Bryan

Offline Bublik

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I see. When I look at undergraduate programs at various universities, I see "Biochemistry" under Life Sciences and maybe "Chemical Physics" under Mathematical and Physical Sciences, but I have never seen Nuclear Chemistry, or Radiochemistry. The fact that the discipline is a whole division in this forum is what sprung my curiosity. Sounds fascinating though.

Thank you for your input.

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