May 26, 2024, 11:54:17 AM
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Topic: I want to work in about process engineering etc... (not lab. or like a chemist)  (Read 7144 times)

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yiberkit

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I have bachelors degree on chemistry. But I dont really want to work in a laboratory in the future private sector job. So, I want to work about process engineering ,designing processes , controls etc.. But, I actually dont know how to start to learn engineering things. Also, other chemistry related without laboratory work position is regulatory affairs which is already involved to pharmaceutical industry. Well, I think I have to choose 1 in two and I should be decide that the choosing job is my future occupation.

What do you suggest me about that? Shall I do a master degree on chemical engineering or something like that?
What are the jobs (working positions) which is not related or include laboratory task?

Offline eazye1334

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The changeover from chemistry to chemical engineering isn't as straightforward as a lot of people think. I don't know what your coursework was like to get your chemistry degree, but there are some differences: fluid dynamics, mass transfer, reactor design, process control & design, LOTS of thermodynamics, etc. From what I know, you'd likely have to take some undergrad courses first because a chemical engineering master's typically just expands on the undergrad classes. That said, there's plenty of people who just get a second bachelor's in chemical engineering, which is nice because you wouldn't have to take things like physics, multiple chemistries, and some of the math classes.

A lot of chemical engineers with bachelor's degrees work in either production/manufacturing environments or at processing equipment designers (heat exchangers, pumps, etc.) That's usually where you start until you build experience, so if this isn't something you're looking for, I'd go consider another direction. Personally, I love working the manufacturing floor. I get a good mix of desk and hands-on work, and in a lot of cases you'll get technicians under you to help. But if you're not interested in at least starting there, I'd probably suggest a different route.

yiberkit

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You mean you are suggesting me to get master degree on chemical engineering? If I do that I will probably take chemical engineering lectures firstly (in first year) and after 2 years for master education which is specifically preferred.

In fact, I have a 4 year undergraduate degree with all of chemistry courses (like instrumental analysis,inorganic,organic,Physical Chemistry and all of laboratory courses plus thermodynamics) in bachelor of science chemistry. So I want to work as a production engineer or something like that in any company. If that master degree could be useful for my work area? I know I will not have a degree on chemical engineering if I will get a master. But I believe this will probably help me to learn and understand some chemical process and designs. I feel myself really confused about that.

Please also read this article : http://chemistry.about.com/od/chemicalengineerin1/a/chemicalengineer.htm

Quote
Educational Requirements for Chemical Engineers

An entry-level chemical engineering job typically requires a college bachelor's degree in engineering. Sometimes a bachelor's degree in chemistry or math or another type of engineering will suffice. A master's degree is helpful.

Offline eazye1334

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No, I'm actually suggesting you should consider a second bachelors degree in chemical engineering. The road to a master's for you is pretty tough because you don't have the engineering background. From my own transcript, here is what you likely have not taken or even seen:

1. Multidimensional calculus
2. linear algebra
3. Process analysis
4. Chemical engineering thermodynamics (I know you took some thermo, but it's likely not the same)
5. Chemical reactor design
6. Fluid dynamics
7. Heat and Mass Transfer
8. Separation processes
9. Process dynamics
10. Process controls
11. Process design

None of those are elective courses, they're all required. Some colleges will have slightly different requirements, but they don't change that much. That's a lot to pick up. It's not impossible, but I know it would be very tough to get accepted into a master's program. Even if you did, without really hitting the early engineering concepts I've listed above, you'd be lost in masters-level classes.

You probably wouldn't be considered for most jobs of the type you are looking for without more of an engineering background. Just about any company that would be willing to accept chemistry as a replacement for chemical engineering is likely going to hire you to work in their quality lab, which you've already said you don't want.

The short answer is there's no easy way for you to get more process design and control experience without taking a bunch of undergraduate classes first. Outside of both involving chemistry, a chemical engineering degree and a chemistry degree are quite different.

yiberkit

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It's hard to re-study for 4 years again. I think I must find an chemical engineering related job, actually. It's more useful than re-study 4 years.

Offline billnotgatez

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At 4 courses Fall, Spring, and Summer, It would be one year.
You have the general, organic, pchem and biochem plus a whole host of other requirements done

Offline eazye1334

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You're probably going to have trouble finding a position then. Most places I've ever been at or looked into would not be interested in "on-the-job" training. Without any engineering courses whatsoever, I think you'll find the process engineering field rather unwelcoming.

yiberkit

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Maybe, I should start in laboratory or chemical workshop at a factory first and then change my position to engineering field when I get more information.

I think it's best to start with learning chemical materials.

Offline eazye1334

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What do you mean by "chemical materials"?

yiberkit

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I mean chemical materials that they using for manufacturing. For example : http://www.hort.purdue.edu/rhodcv/hort640c/ammonia/amsou.gif  In ammonia production, I need to know all reagent chemical materials , like Asparagin, Glutamin ,nitrate etc.. It will just give me a basic info about start to learning process engineering.

Offline eazye1334

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See, I think you're focusing on entirely the wrong things to get where you want to be. However, this conversation is completely going in circles. You asked for suggestions, and as a current process/product engineer I've given you suggestions, but you've already made up your mind on doing something else. As such, it's pointless for me to continue, so I will just wish you good luck in the future.

Offline consul

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Chemist does not equal chemical engineer.

You will need a lot of additional "education" to reach to that level of being a process engineer.
Engineering training is basically different than the sciences degree. 

The best route for you, believe me, is to take a second bachelor's degree and let it be B.S. in Chemical Engineering. I suppose some of the courses you have taken may earn credit and you don't have to take them up again, but as pointed out earlier, there are really unique courses that are inherent in chemical engineering.

And yes, you will need some On the Job experience too. Process engineering is not done overnight. It is a lifetime engineering experience. Try to catch up by reading chemical engineering books. But, seriously, do consider the suggestion to take up another degree.

Take care and may the Lord bless you.
Allan S. Hugo, Ch.E.
Editor, ChemBookStore
A good source of chemical engineering books
Build a solid chemical engineering library now.

yiberkit

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So, what will the benefit of having two bs degrees(chemist and chemical engineer)? Is that bring me more benefits for chemical industry and other industries?

Offline eazye1334

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Yes, you would likely get more opportunities with the two degrees, but that's not the main point. As multiple people have pointed out, if your ultimate goal is to get into process engineering, the only guaranteed way you can do it is to fill in the educational gaps.

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