December 11, 2019, 12:11:24 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Physical Chemistry- Using the integrated Vant Hoff Equation with K values.  (Read 2568 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Twickel

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 177
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Gender: Male
The equilibrium concentration of oxygen in fresh water exposed to the atmosphere is given for two temperatures. At 15 degrees celcius equilib [O2]= 630μmol/L at 25 degrees celcius equiln [O2]= 517μmol/L

The expression for the equilibrium constant, K, between the oxygen in the gas phase and in solution is given by K=[O2]/PO2/atm. Where pO2 is the partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen.

I need to calculate the enthalpy of dissolution, I figured I need to use the integrated Vant hoff equation.
But how do I figure out the partial pressues of oxygen so I can calculate the equilibrium constants? I know that P= xa x P^*

[Thank you

Offline Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Posts: 25361
  • Mole Snacks: +1663/-398
  • Gender: Male
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re: Physical Chemistry- Using the integrated Vant Hoff Equation with K values.
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2012, 08:16:23 AM »
21% of oxygen in the atmosphere.
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Offline Twickel

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 177
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Gender: Male
Re: Physical Chemistry- Using the integrated Vant Hoff Equation with K values.
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2012, 08:28:23 AM »
so Kp at 25 degrees is equal to 298/[0.21/1]?
= 1,419

Offline Twickel

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 177
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Gender: Male
Re: Physical Chemistry- Using the integrated Vant Hoff Equation with K values.
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2012, 03:11:25 AM »
Sorry about that, got mixed up.

Is the Kp value at 25 degrees Kp=[517/0.21/1] = 2461?

Sponsored Links