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Topic: Glass digestion for ICP-OES analysis  (Read 11849 times)

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Offline Jasim

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Re: Glass digestion for ICP-OES analysis
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2012, 02:54:50 PM »
Well I'm not heating it. But I'm using some..I think they are like PTFE or something vials....When I do heat in microwave digestion I have special teflon vials with kevlar sleeves in pressure clamps.

Teflon is supposed to be good for HF, but some still leeches out of even the container the concentrated HF comes in. The container is pretty discolored, I never touch with bare hands.

Offline osmium

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Re: Glass digestion for ICP-OES analysis
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2012, 03:05:00 PM »
Well I'm not heating it. But I'm using some..I think they are like PTFE or something vials....When I do heat in microwave digestion I have special teflon vials with kevlar sleeves in pressure clamps.

Teflon is supposed to be good for HF, but some still leeches out of even the container the concentrated HF comes in. The container is pretty discolored, I never touch with bare hands.

I never touch anything without wearing gloves when working with HF.  Sometimes I'll put two pairs on.

You won't realize you're been burned by HF until hours later.

Offline Jasim

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Re: Glass digestion for ICP-OES analysis
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2012, 03:54:09 PM »
I'm with you Osmium. I wear disposable neoprene gloves under some heavy-duty neoprene gloves, with a thick rubber apron over my labcoat, and then behind the sash of a fume hood. HF interferes with nerve signalling and has a low disassociation constant...That means you don't feel it, it doesn't burn, but it's readily taken up into lipid tissue. Only 25 square cm of skin exposure is needed for cardiac arrest. Nasty stuff.

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